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Leading indicators of country risk and currency crises: the Asian experience

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  • Marcelle Chauvet
  • Fang Dong

Abstract

Most emerging capital markets in recent years adopted a system that narrowly pegs their currencies’ exchange rates to the U.S. dollar. While such a system has a number of advantages, it makes a country vulnerable to shocks in mobile international capital markets and can lead to reactive strategies that can drive the country into a currency crisis and inflationary recession. ; This article aims to construct an early warning system for international currency crises using financial variables reflecting investors’ expectations and banking distress, which are highly sensitive to changes in the economic environment. The authors use a dynamic factor model that switches between two regimes—representing periods of relative calmness and periods prone to currency crises—to construct leading indicators of country risk and currency crises. ; The method is applied to evaluate the model’s in-sample and out-of-sample performance in anticipating currency crises in the last two decades in Thailand, Indonesia, and Korea. The model successfully produces early signals of these crises, particularly the most severe one, which occurred in 1997. ; The study’s success in signaling future currency crises in real time demonstrates that the model’s “country risk” indicators can be informative tools that allow central banks to take preemptive counterpolicy measures to avoid a crisis or mitigate its severity.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta in its journal Economic Review.

Volume (Year): (2004)
Issue (Month): Q 1 ()
Pages: 25 - 37

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedaer:y:2004:i:q1:p:25-37:n:v.89no.1

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  1. Arthur F. Burns & Wesley C. Mitchell, 1946. "Measuring Business Cycles," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number burn46-1, octubre-d.
  2. Francis X. Diebold & Glenn D. Rudebusch, 1994. "Measuring Business Cycles: A Modern Perspective," NBER Working Papers 4643, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hamilton, James D, 1989. "A New Approach to the Economic Analysis of Nonstationary Time Series and the Business Cycle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 357-84, March.
  4. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey Sachs, 1998. "The Onset of the East Asian Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 6680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Chauvet, Marcelle, 1998. "An Econometric Characterization of Business Cycle Dynamics with Factor Structure and Regime Switching," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 969-96, November.
  6. Chang-Jin Kim & Charles R. Nelson, 1998. "Business Cycle Turning Points, A New Coincident Index, And Tests Of Duration Dependence Based On A Dynamic Factor Model With Regime Switching," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(2), pages 188-201, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Andrea Cipollini & George Kapetanios, 2005. "Forecasting Financial Crises and Contagion in Asia Using Dynamic Factor Analysis," Working Papers 538, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
  2. Cipollini, A. & Kapetanios, G., 2009. "Forecasting financial crises and contagion in Asia using dynamic factor analysis," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 188-200, March.
  3. Thangjam Rajeshwar Singh, 2011. "An ordered probit model of an early warning system for predicting financial crisis in India," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Proceedings of the IFC Conference on "Initiatives to address data gaps revealed by the financial crisis", Basel, 25-26 August 2010, volume 34, pages 185-201 Bank for International Settlements.
  4. Carolina Arteaga cabrales & Carlos Huertas Campos & Sergio Olarte Armenta, 2012. "Índice de Desbalance Macroeconómico," Borradores de Economia 744, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  5. Yilmazkuday, Hakan & Akay, Koray, 2008. "An analysis of regime shifts in the Turkish economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 885-898, September.
  6. Christian Aßmann & Jens Boysen-Hogrefe, 2010. "Analysis of current account reversals via regime switching models," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 21-43, February.
  7. Jiranyakul, Komain & Opiela, Timothy, 2014. "Market Discipline at Thai Banks before the Asian Crisis," MPRA Paper 54492, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Derrick Reagle & Dominick Salvatore, 2005. "Robustness of Forecasting Financial Crises in Emerging Market Economies with Data Revisions—A Note," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 209-216, April.

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