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The effect of education on fertility: Evidence from a compulsory schooling reform

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  • Cygan-Rehm, Kamila
  • Maeder, Miriam
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    Abstract

    This paper investigates the effect of education on fertility under inflexible labor market conditions. We exploit exogenous variation from a German compulsory schooling reform to deal with the endogeneity of education. By using data from two complementary datasets, we examine different fertility outcomes over the life cycle. In contrast to evidence for other developed countries, we find that increased education causally reduces completed fertility. This negative effect operates through a postponement of first births away from teenage years and no catch-up later in life. We attribute these findings to the particularly high opportunity costs of childrearing in Germany.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927537113000584
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 35-48

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:25:y:2013:i:c:p:35-48

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

    Related research

    Keywords: Fertility; Education; Childlessness; Timing of births; Educational reform;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Mevlude Akbulut Yuksel & Mutlu Yuksel, 2013. "The Long-Term Direct and External Effects of Jewish Expulsions in Nazi Germany," HiCN Working Papers 154, Households in Conflict Network.

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