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The effect of talent disparity on team productivity in soccer

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  • Franck, Egon
  • Nüesch, Stephan

Abstract

Theory predicts that the interaction type within a team moderates the impact of talent disparity on team productivity. Using panel data from professional German soccer teams, we test talent composition effects at different team levels characterized by different interaction types. At the match level, complementarities are expected due to the continuous interaction of the fielded players. If the entire squad is analyzed at the seasonal level, substitutability emerges from the fact that only a (varying) selection of players can prove their talent in the competition games. Holding average ability and unobserved team heterogeneity constant, we find that the players selected to play on the competition team should be rather homogeneous regarding their talent. However, if we relate talent differences within the entire squad to the team's league standing at the end of the season, talent disparity turns out to be beneficial.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Psychology.

Volume (Year): 31 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 218-229

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Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:31:y:2010:i:2:p:218-229

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joep

Related research

Keywords: Ability grouping Ability level Productivity;

References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Egon Franck & Stephan Nüesch & Jan Pieper, 2009. "Specific Human Capital as a Source of Superior Team Performance," Working Papers 0113, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  2. Bernd Frick & Young Lee, 2011. "Temporal variations in technical efficiency: evidence from German soccer," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 15-24, February.
  3. Gürtler, Marc & Gürtler, Oliver, 2013. "The optimality of heterogeneous tournaments," Working Papers IF42V1, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Institute of Finance.
  4. Vanessa Mertins & Agnes Baeker, 2012. "Risk-sorting and preference for team piece rates," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201208, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
  5. Stephan Nuesch & Hartmut Haas, 2012. "Empirical Evidence on the “Never Change a Winning Team” Heuristic," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 232(3), pages 247-257, May.
  6. Hartmut Haas & Stephan Nuesch, 2013. "Are multinational teams more successful?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0088, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  7. Sander Hoogendoorn & Simon C. Parker & Mirjam van Praag, 2012. "Ability Dispersion and Team Performance: A Field Experiment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-130/VII, Tinbergen Institute.

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