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Age structure and inflation - a Wicksellian interpretation of the OECD data

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  • Lindh, Thomas
  • Malmberg, Bo

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 36 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)
Pages: 19-37

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:36:y:1998:i:1:p:19-37

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  1. Clark, Todd E, 1997. "Cross-country Evidence on Long-Run Growth and Inflation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(1), pages 70-81, January.
  2. Fair, Ray C & Dominguez, Kathryn M, 1991. "Effects of the Changing U.S. Age Distribution on Macroeconomic Equations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1276-94, December.
  3. Claes-Henric Siven, 1998. "Two early Swedish debates about Wicksell's cumulative process," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 120-139.
  4. Kenny, Lawrence W, 1991. "Cross-Country Estimates of the Demand for Money and Its Components," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(4), pages 696-705, October.
  5. Jagadeesh Gokhale & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & John Sabelhaus, 1996. "Understanding the Postwar Decline in U.S. Saving: A Cohort Analysis," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(1), pages 315-407.
  6. Claes-Henric Siven, 1997. "Capital Theory and Equilibrium Method in Wicksell's Cumulative Process," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 29(2), pages 201-217, Summer.
  7. Leff, Nathaniel H, 1969. "Dependency Rates and Savings Rates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(5), pages 886-96, December.
  8. Newey, Whitney K & West, Kenneth D, 1987. "A Simple, Positive Semi-definite, Heteroskedasticity and Autocorrelation Consistent Covariance Matrix," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(3), pages 703-08, May.
  9. Deaton, Angus, 1992. "Understanding Consumption," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288244, September.
  10. Lindh, Thomas & Malmberg, Bo, 1996. "Age Structure Effects and Growth in the OECD, 1950-90: Further Evidence," Working Paper Series 1996:12, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  11. Robert M. Schmidt & Allen C. Kelley, 1996. "Saving, dependency and development," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 365-386.
  12. Kelley, Allen C & Schmidt, Robert M, 1996. "Saving, Dependency and Development," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 365-86, November.
  13. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  14. Blomquist, N.S. & Wijkander, H., 1993. "Fertility Waves, Aggregate Savings and the Rate of Interest," Papers 1993-9, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
  15. Lindh, T. & Malmberg, B., 1995. "Human Capital, Age Structure, and Growth in OECD , 1950- 1990," Papers 1995-10, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
  16. Fischer, Stanley, 1972. "Keynes-Wicksell and Neoclassical Models of Money and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(5), pages 880-90, December.
  17. MacKinnon, Keith & Smithin, John, 1993. "An interest rate peg, inflation and output," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 769-785.
  18. Weil, David N, 1994. "The Saving of the Elderly in Micro and Macro Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(1), pages 55-81, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Jaypee Sevilla, 2001. "Economic Growth and the Demographic Transition," NBER Working Papers 8685, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Etienne Farvaque & Jerome Hericourt & Ga�l Lagadec, 2010. "Central bank independence and ageing," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(12), pages 1167-1171.
  3. Lindh, Thomas & Malmberg, Bo, 1999. "Age Distributions and the Current Account -A Changing Relation?," Working Paper Series 1999:21, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  4. Bruér, Mattias, 2002. "Can Demography Improve Inflation Forecasts? The Case of Sweden," Working Paper Series 2002:4, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  5. Mitsuru Katagiri, 2012. "Economic Consequences of Population Aging in Japan: Effects through Changes in Demand Structure," IMES Discussion Paper Series 12-E-03, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
  6. Diane Macunovich, 1999. "The Baby Boom As It Ages: How Has It Affected Patterns of Consumptions and Savings in the United States?," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 7, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  7. Skans, Oskar Nordstrom, 2005. "Age effects in Swedish local labor markets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 86(3), pages 419-426, March.
  8. Lindh, Thomas, 1999. "Medium-Term Forecasts of Potential GDP and Inflation Using Age Structure Information," Working Paper Series 99, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
  9. Michael Berlemann & Marco Oestmann & Marcel Thum, 2010. "Demographic Change and Bank Profitability. Empirical Evidence from German Savings Banks," CESifo Working Paper Series 2911, CESifo Group Munich.
  10. Andersson, Andreas & Österholm, Pär, 2001. "The Impact of Demography on the Real Exchange Rate," Working Paper Series 2001:11, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  11. Lindh, Thomas & Malmberg, Bo, 2000. "Can age structure forecast inflation trends?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 31-49.

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