Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Does community and household tree planting imply increased use of wood for fuel? Evidence from Ethiopia

Contents:

Author Info

  • Gebreegziabher, Zenebe
  • van Kooten, G. Cornelis

Abstract

As a result of many years of deforestation, fuelwood scarcity is a critical problem in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian government encouraged afforestation and tree growing at both the community and household levels as a policy to stem deforestation and degradation of agricultural lands. The rationale underlying the tree growing strategy is that some significant part of whatever is planted will be used as fuelwood, thereby reducing the demand for wood from native forestlands and use of crop residues and animal dung needed for soil improvement. It is incumbent, however, to ask: Does household or community tree planting indeed translate into greater use of wood for fuel? To address this question, fuelwood consumption in Ethiopia is examined using datasets from sample cross-sections of 500 households and 100 communities in the highlands of Tigrai, northern Ethiopia. The results of such an analysis provide important insights into the potential effectiveness of the tree growing or afforestation strategy as a partial remedy to the country's fuel problems. Findings suggest, however, that there may not be a link between tree planting and the use of such fiber for fuelwood.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S138993411300049X
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Forest Policy and Economics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 30-40

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:34:y:2013:i:c:p:30-40

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forpol

Related research

Keywords: Fuelwood consumption; Household and community investment in trees; Heckman selection model; Tigrai; Ethiopia;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Hosier, Richard H. & Dowd, Jeffrey, 1987. "Household fuel choice in Zimbabwe : An empirical test of the energy ladder hypothesis," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 347-361, December.
  2. Pender, John & Place, Frank & Ehui, Simeon K., 2006. "Sustainable land management: lessons from the East African Highlands," Issue briefs 43, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Bluffstone Randall A., 1995. "The Effect of Labor Market Performance on Deforestation in Developing Countries under Open Access: An Example from Rural Nepal," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 42-63, July.
  4. Mas-Colell, Andreu & Whinston, Michael D. & Green, Jerry R., 1995. "Microeconomic Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195102680, October.
  5. Rasmus Heltberg & Thomas Channing Arndt & Nagothu Udaya Sekhar, 2000. "Fuelwood Consumption and Forest Degradation: A Household Model for Domestic Energy Substitution in Rural India," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(2), pages 213-232.
  6. Sandeep H. Patel & Thomas C. Pinckney & William K. Jaeger, 1995. "Smallholder Wood Production and Population Pressure in East Africa: Evidence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(4), pages 516-530.
  7. Martin Linde-Rahr, 2003. "Property Rights and Deforestation: The Choice of Fuelwood Source in Rural Viet Nam," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(2), pages 217-234.
  8. Campbell, B. M. & Vermeulen, S. J. & Mangono, J. J. & Mabugu, R., 2003. "The energy transition in action: urban domestic fuel choices in a changing Zimbabwe," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 553-562, May.
  9. Jagger, Pamela & Pender, John L. & Gebremedhin, Berhanu, 2003. "Woodlot devolution in Northern Ethiopia: opportunities for empowerment, smallholder income diversification and sustainable land management," EPTD discussion papers 107, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Alemu Mekonnen, 2009. "Tenure Security, Resource Endowments, and Tree Growing: Evidence from the Amhara Region of Ethiopia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(2), pages 292-307.
  11. Gunnar Köhlin & Peter J. Parks, 2001. "Spatial Variability and Disincentives to Harvest: Deforestation and Fuelwood Collection in South Asia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(2), pages 206-218.
  12. van Kooten, G. Cornelis & Wong, Linda, 2010. "Economics of wind power when national grids are unreliable," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1991-1998, April.
  13. Mekonnen, Alemu & Damte, Abebe, 2011. "Private Trees as Household Assets and Determinants of Tree-Growing Behavior in Rural Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-11-14-efd, Resources For the Future.
  14. Cooke, Priscilla A, 1998. "Intrahousehold Labor Allocation Responses to Environmental Good Scarcity: A Case Study from the Hills of Nepal," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(4), pages 807-30, July.
  15. Scherr, Sara J., 1995. "Economic factors in farmer adoption of agroforestry: Patterns observed in Western Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 787-804, May.
  16. Godoy, Ricardo A., 1992. "Determinants of smallholder commercial tree cultivation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 713-725, May.
  17. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  18. Jagger, Pamela & Pender, John L., 2000. "The role of trees for sustainable management of less-favored lands: the case of eucalyptus in Ethiopia," EPTD discussion papers 65, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  19. van 't Veld, Klaas & Narain, Urvashi & Gupta, Shreekant & Chopra, Neetu & Singh, Supriya, 2006. "India's Firewood Crisis Re-examined," Discussion Papers dp-06-25, Resources For the Future.
  20. Cooke, Priscilla & Köhlin, Gunnar & Hyde, William F., 2008. "Fuelwood, forests and community management – evidence from household studies," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 103-135, February.
  21. Dewees, Peter A., 1995. "Trees on farms in Malawi: Private investment, public policy, and farmer choice," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(7), pages 1085-1102, July.
  22. Bluffstone, Randall & Boscolo, Marco & Molina, Ramiro, 2008. "Does better common property forest management promote behavioral change? On-farm tree planting in the Bolivian Andes," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(02), pages 137-170, April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:34:y:2013:i:c:p:30-40. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.