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Female employment and occupational changes in the 1990s: How is the EU performing relative to the US?

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  • Dolado, J. J.
  • Felgueroso, F.
  • Jimeno, J. F.

Abstract

This paper provides a comparison of the incidence and composition of female employment both in the EU and in the US. Despite a significant increase in female labour market participation in the EU, about 50% of the difference between the employment rates in the US and the EU can still be attributed to differences in the educational attainments and the employment rates of women aged 25-54. We highlight the main features of femaleemployment in both areas, paying particular attention to the differences across age cohorts and educational levels. Our main findings are as follows: i) the educational level of the EU female population is slowly converging to that of the US, ii) the employment rates of less educated women are much lower in the EU than in the US (with the exceptions of the Scandinavian countries) even for women aged 25-34, and iii) occupational segregation is lower for the younger highly educated women who seem to be entering more typically male occupations and less typically female occupations, although at a higher rate in the US than in the EU.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 45 (2001)
Issue (Month): 4-6 (May)
Pages: 875-889

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:45:y:2001:i:4-6:p:875-889

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References

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  1. Dora L. Costa, 2000. "From Mill Town to Board Room: The Rise of Women's Paid Labor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 101-122, Fall.
  2. Francine Blau & Patricia Simpson & Deborah Anderson, 1998. "Continuing Progress? Trends in Occupational Segregation in the United States over the 1970s and 1980s," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 29-71.
  3. Chinhui Juhn & Sandra E. Black, 2000. "The Rise of Female Professionals: Are Women Responding to Skill Demand?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 450-455, May.
  4. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1998. "The Shaping of Higher Education: The Formative Years in the United States, 1890 to 1940," NBER Working Papers 6537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1997. "Why the United States Led in Education: Lessons from Secondary School Expansion, 1910 to 1940," NBER Working Papers 6144, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Claudia Goldin, 1999. "A Brief History of Education in the United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0119, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Tournemaine, Frederic & Tsoukis, Christopher, 2008. "Status, fertility, growth and the great transition," MPRA Paper 8669, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Juan J. Dolado & Florentino Felgueroso & Juan F. Jimeno., . "Recent Trends in Occupational Segregation by Gender: A Look Across the Atlantic," Working Papers 2002-11, FEDEA.
  3. Havnes, Tarjei & Mogstad, Magne, 2009. "Money for Nothing? Universal Child Care and Maternal Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 4504, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Wolf, Elke & Heinze, Anja, 2007. "How to Limit Discrimination? Analyzing the Effects of Innovative Workplace Practices on Intra-Firm Gender Wage Gaps Using Linked Employer-Employee Data," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-077, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  5. Juan F. Jimeno & Diego Rodríguez-Palenzuela, 2003. "Youth Unemployment in the OECD: Demographic Shifts, Labour Market Institutions and Macroeconomic Shocks," Economics Working Papers 019, European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes.
  6. Jacques, Jean-François & Walkowiak, Emmanuelle, 2009. "Low wages and high unemployment rates : The role of social interactions in hiring discrimination," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/1902, Paris Dauphine University.
  7. Juan Dolado & Florentino Felgueroso & Miguel Almunia, 2012. "Are men and women-economists evenly distributed across research fields? Some new empirical evidence," SERIEs, Spanish Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 367-393, September.

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