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Recent Trends in Occupational Segregation by Gender: A Look Across the Atlantic

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  • Juan J. Dolado
  • Florentino Felgueroso
  • Juan F. Jimeno.

Abstract

In this paper, we analyse the recent patterns of occupational segregation by gender in the EU countries vis-á-vis the US. Given the lack of long time-series data on homogeneous LFS data about occupations and educational attainments for male and female workers in EU countries, we use a single cross section corresponding to 1999 as the basis of comparison, hoping to uncover convergence trends by examining whether the EU-Us differentials in gender occupational segregation decline across age cohorts. The main findings of our study are: (i) gender segregation has been declining across age cohorts in the case of female graduates and has remained steady for those with lower educational levels; in particular, the level of segregation for the former group is higher in the EU than in the US; (ii) gender segregation seems to be positively correlated with the share of part-time jobs; and (iii) there is some evidence, albeit a weak one, that the gender wage gap and occupational segregation are positively correlated, particularly when the Scandinavian countries are excluded from the sample.

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Paper provided by FEDEA in its series Working Papers with number 2002-11.

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Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2002-11

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  1. Miller, Paul W, 1987. "The Wage Effect of the Occupational Segregation of Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 885-96, December.
  2. Chinhui Juhn & Sandra E. Black, 2000. "The Rise of Female Professionals: Are Women Responding to Skill Demand?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 450-455, May.
  3. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1997. "Why the United States Led in Education: Lessons from Secondary School Expansion, 1910 to 1940," NBER Working Papers 6144, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Polachek, Solomon William, 1981. "Occupational Self-Selection: A Human Capital Approach to Sex Differences in Occupational Structure," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(1), pages 60-69, February.
  5. Dora L. Costa, 2000. "From Mill Town to Board Room: The Rise of Women's Paid Labor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 101-122, Fall.
  6. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
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