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Cross-Country Inequality Trends

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  • Daron Acemoglu

    (MIT)

Abstract

I review the two most popular explanations for the differential trends in wage inequality in US/UK and Europe: that relative supply of skills increased faster in Europe, and that European labour market institutions prevented inequality from increasing. Although these explanations go some way towards accounting for the differential cross-country inequality trends, it also appears that relative demand for skills increased differentially across countries. I develop a simple theory where labour market institutions creating wage compression in Europe also encourage more investment in technologies increasing the productivity of less-skilled workers, implying less skill-biased technical change in Europe than the US. Copyright Royal Economic Society 2003

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Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 113 (2003)
Issue (Month): 485 (February)
Pages: F121-F149

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:113:y:2003:i:485:p:f121-f149

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  1. Desigualdad de ingresos: su evolución en 100 años de historia
    by Kiko Llaneras in Politikon on 2012-05-15 06:50:18
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