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Skill Supply and Biased technical change

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  • Patricia Crifo

    (Department of Economics, Ecole Polytechnique - CNRS : UMR7176 - Polytechnique - X)

Abstract

Cet article contribue au débat sur le progrès technique biaisé en analysant la dynamique de l'offre de travail qualifié et l'inégalité salariale dans un modèle de croissance endogène avec progrès technique biaisé en faveur des capacités. En raison d'un effet de découragement, l'augmentation des inégalités intra groupes réduit l'incitaiton à s'éduquer pour ceux qui ont des capacités ordinaires. Ce méchanisme induit une relation non montone entre le taux de croisance de l'économie et l'offre de travail qualifié, phénomène qui s'est manifesté dans certains grands pays de l'OCDE au cours des années 1970 et 1980.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number hal-00243031.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Publication status: Published, Labour Economics, 2008, 15, 818-830
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00243031

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Cited by:
  1. Arnaud Dupuy, 2012. "The assignment of workers to tasks with endogenous supply of skills," Working Papers 2012/45, Maastricht School of Management.
  2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Menbere Shiferaw, 2011. "Decomposing the education wage gap: everything but the kitchen sink," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue July, pages 243-272.

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