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A Role For Cultural Transmission In Fertility Transitions

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  • Baudin, Thomas

Abstract

The paper proposes an economic and cultural mechanism that can predict a fertility transition and its timing. The cultural structure of the population is endogenously determined by a cultural evolution mechanism. The fertility rates reduction in the long run is always the result of an interaction between the cultural and economic structures of the society. Permanent productivity schocks have to distort sufficiently the cultural structure of the population to make acceptable modern behaviours (in term of fertility) to the traditionalist parents. An increase in the average income level provoked by the technological progress will be necessary but not sufficient condition to undergo a fertility transition. Finally, a fertility transition can always appear in the economy whathever the initial cultural structure but that cultural structure determines the timing of the transition.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Macroeconomic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 14 (2010)
Issue (Month): 04 (September)
Pages: 454-481

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Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:14:y:2010:i:04:p:454-481_09

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Javier Olivera, 2013. "Old-age Support and Demographic Transition in Developing Countries. A Cultural Transmission Model," Working Papers 201307, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  2. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00564898 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Rainald Borck, 2011. "Adieu Rabenmutter - The Effect of Culture on Fertility, Female Labour Supply, the Gender Wage Gap and Childcare," CESifo Working Paper Series 3337, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Thomas Baudin, 2012. "More on Religion and Fertility: The French Connection," Working Papers hal-00993310, HAL.
  5. Matthias Doepke & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2013. "Culture, Entrepreneurship, and Growth," NBER Working Papers 19141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Rainald Borck, 2014. "Adieu Rabenmutter—culture, fertility, female labour supply, the gender wage gap and childcare," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 739-765, July.
  7. Grégory Ponthière, 2010. "Mortality, family and lifestyles," PSE Working Papers halshs-00564898, HAL.
  8. Alberto Bisin & Thierry Verdier, 2010. "The Economics of Cultural Transmission and Socialization," NBER Working Papers 16512, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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