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Natural Selection and the Origin of Economic Growth

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  • Galor, Oded
  • Moav, Omer

Abstract

This research develops an evolutionary growth theory that captures the interplay between the evolution of mankind and economic growth since the emergence of the human species. This unified theory encompasses the observed evolution of population, technology and income per capita in the long transition from an epoch of Malthusian stagnation to sustained economic growth. The theory suggests that prolonged economic stagnation prior to the transition to sustained growth stimulated natural selection that shaped the evolution of the human species, whereas the evolution of the human species was the origin of the take-off from an epoch of stagnation to sustained growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 2727.

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Date of creation: Mar 2001
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2727

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Keywords: Evolution; Fertility; Growth; Human Capital; Malthusian Stagnation; Natural Selection; Technological Progress;

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References

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  21. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 1996. "The Origins of Technology-Skill Complementarity," NBER Working Papers 5657, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  26. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1996. "Technical Change and Human-Capital Returns and Investments: Evidence from the Green Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 931-53, September.
  27. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-46, September.
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  1. Persistence in Economic Development
    by dvollrath in The Growth Economics Blog on 2014-05-12 16:51:12
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