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Comportement familial, inégalités et croissance : Une revue de la littérature

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  • Michael Grimm

    ()
    (University of Göttingen, Department of Economics, DIW and DIAL)

Abstract

This article surveys models of endogenous growth which are based on the microeconomic theory of family behaviour. A special emphasis is placed on the suggested formalization of the preferences, demographic behaviour, investment in human capital, production technology, labour market, and heterogeneity of agents. The interaction between fertility and per capita growth of income via investment decisions in human capital and the cost of time constitute the recurrent element of these models. One major implication, is that the decline of fertility in the industrialised countries is more a consequence than a cause of development. Furthermore, the models suggest that policies which increase x cost per child, reduce the cost of education, stimulate accumulation of human capital, and encourage female activity raise the probability of development and contribute to a reduction of inequality. Additional re nements to the models might still prove worthwhile particularly regarding the representation of demographic behaviour. Only some account for intra-generational inequality, even though this is essential to understand the link between growth and income distribution. _________________________________ Cet article entreprend une revue de la littérature des théories de la croissance endogène offrant une représentation microéconomique de la famille. Une attention particulière est accordée aux différentes formalisations proposées pour modéliser les préférences, les comportements démographiques, l'investissement en capital humain, la technologie de production, le marché du travail et l'hétérogénéité des agents. L'interaction entre fécondité et croissance du produit par tête via l'investissement en capital humain et le coût du temps constitue l'élément récurrent de ces modèles. Ceux-ci suggèrent que le déclin de la fécondité dans les pays aujourd'hui industrialisés est plus une conséquence qu'une cause du développement. De plus ces travaux montrent qu'une politique qui augmente le coût fixe par enfant, réduit le prix de l'éducation, stimule l'accumulation de capital humain et encourage l'activité des femmes, augmentera la probabilité de développement et contribuera à réduire les inégalités. Ces modèles méritent d'être affinés particulierement en ce qui concerne la formalisation de la démographie. Peu de modèles prennent en compte l'inégalité intragénérationnelle, pourtant essentielle à la compréhension du lien entre croissance économique et distribution du revenu.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation) in its series Working Papers with number DT/2000/09.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dia:wpaper:dt200009

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Keywords: Demographic transition; endogenous growth; human capital; inequality; new home economics; overlapping generations.;

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