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Reference-Dependent Effects of Unemployment on Mental Health

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  • Grunow, Martina

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  • Grunow, Martina, 2013. "Reference-Dependent Effects of Unemployment on Mental Health," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80051, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:80051
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card & Gordon B. Dahl, 2011. "Family Violence and Football: The Effect of Unexpected Emotional Cues on Violent Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 103-143.
    2. Botond Kőszegi & Matthew Rabin, 2006. "A Model of Reference-Dependent Preferences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 1133-1165.
    3. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2005. "Healthy living in hard times," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 341-363.
    4. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-659, May.
    5. Jordi Mondria & Climent Quintana‐Domeque, 2013. "Financial Contagion and Attention Allocation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123(568), pages 429-454, May.
    6. Andrew Clark & Andreas Knabe & Steffen Rätzel, 2009. "Unemployment as a Social Norm in Germany," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(2), pages 251-260.
    7. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 617-650.
    8. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 617-650.
    9. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2003. "Good times make you sick," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 637-658.
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