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The impact of information risk and market stress on institutional trading: New evidence through the lens of a simulated herd model

  • Boortz, Christopher K.
  • Jurkatis, Simon
  • Kremer, Stephanie
  • Nautz, Dieter

This paper sheds new light on the impact of information risk and market stress on herding of institutional traders from both, a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Using numerical simulations of a herd model, we show that buy and sell herding intensity should increase with information risk. Market stress should affect herding asymmetrically: while there is more sell herding when the market becomes more pessimistic and more uncertain, buy herding intensity should decrease. We test these predictions using intra-day herding measures based on high-frequent, investor-specific trading data of all institutional investors in the German stock market. The evidence provides strong support for an increasing effect of information risk on herding intensity on an intra-day basis. However, in contrast to the simulation results empirical herding measures indicate that buy herding has even slightly increased, not decreased, during the recent crisis period.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/79728/1/VfS_2013_pid_416.pdf
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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 79728.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79728
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  1. Russ Wermers, 1999. "Mutual Fund Herding and the Impact on Stock Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(2), pages 581-622, 04.
  2. Lawrence R. Glosten & Paul R. Milgrom, 1983. "Bid, Ask and Transaction Prices in a Specialist Market with Heterogeneously Informed Traders," Discussion Papers 570, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  3. Avery, Christopher & Zemsky, Peter, 1998. "Multidimensional Uncertainty and Herd Behavior in Financial Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(4), pages 724-48, September.
  4. Kremer, Stephanie & Nautz, Dieter, 2013. "Causes and consequences of short-term institutional herding," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1676-1686.
  5. Richard W. Sias, 2004. "Institutional Herding," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 17(1), pages 165-206.
  6. Hwang, Soosung & Salmon, Mark, 2004. "Market Stress and Herding," CEPR Discussion Papers 4340, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Lakonishok, Josef & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1992. "The impact of institutional trading on stock prices," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 23-43, August.
  8. David Hirshleifer & Siew Hong Teoh, 2003. "Herd Behaviour and Cascading in Capital Markets: a Review and Synthesis," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 9(1), pages 25-66.
  9. Bikhchandani, Sushil & Hirshleifer, David & Welch, Ivo, 1992. "A Theory of Fads, Fashion, Custom, and Cultural Change in Informational Cascades," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 992-1026, October.
  10. Zhou, Rhea Tingyu & Lai, Rose Neng, 2009. "Herding and information based trading," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 388-393, June.
  11. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521824019 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Choi, Nicole & Sias, Richard W., 2009. "Institutional industry herding," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(3), pages 469-491, December.
  13. Park, A. & Sabourian, H., 2009. "Herding and Contrarian Behaviour in Financial Markets," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0939, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  14. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev, 1998. "Deutsche Mark-Dollar Volatility: Intraday Activity Patterns, Macroeconomic Announcements, and Longer Run Dependencies," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(1), pages 219-265, 02.
  15. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521530927 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Barber, Brad M. & Odean, Terrance & Zhu, Ning, 2009. "Systematic noise," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 547-569, November.
  17. Banerjee, Abhijit V, 1992. "A Simple Model of Herd Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(3), pages 797-817, August.
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