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Governing network neutrality: Public perception and policy capacity

  • Shin, Donghee
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    Beyond technical matters, the network neutrality debate is closely tied to social, political, and economic debate over networks and the duties and the rights of various stakeholders. The study contextualizes the issue in terms of policy, innovation, values, and the society of Korean context. Focusing on user perspective, it analyzes the policy effectiveness of current network neutrality by analyzing user perception. A model is proposed to empirically test the policy effectiveness by incorporating factors representing network neutrality. The factors are drawn from the belief of people's perceived concepts on network neutrality. The findings show that while competition and regulation are the two main factors constituting network neutrality, both factors influence the formation of attitude toward policy effectiveness differently. Policy and managerial implications are discussed based on the model. Overall, this study provides in-depth analysis and heuristic data on the user drivers, industry dynamics, and policy implication within the network neutrality ecosystem.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/88540/1/774545275.pdf
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    Paper provided by International Telecommunications Society (ITS) in its series 24th European Regional ITS Conference, Florence 2013 with number 88540.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:itse13:88540
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.itseurope.org/

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    1. Wallsten Scott & Hausladen Stephanie, 2009. "Net Neutrality, Unbundling, and their Effects on International Investment in Next-Generation Networks," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-23, March.
    2. Chris Edmond, 2007. "Information Revolutions and the Overthrow of Autocratic Regimes," Working Papers 07-26, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    3. Shrimali, Gireesh, 2008. "Surplus extraction by network providers: Implications for net neutrality and innovation," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 545-558, September.
    4. Robin S. Lee & Tim Wu, 2009. "Subsidizing Creativity through Network Design: Zero-Pricing and Net Neutrality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(3), pages 61-76, Summer.
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