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Structural change, rebalancing, and the danger of a middle-income trap in China

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  • Wagner, Helmut

Abstract

China is currently experiencing a structural change toward tertiarization and an implied growth slowdown associated with it. The paper investigates whether this growth slowdown is merely cyclical or a negative trend, and further what China is doing or should do to avoid falling into a ``middle-income trap,'' a problem many emerging economies have experienced in recent decades. The pitfalls of the current ``soft'' rebalancing policy in China are analyzed in the context of this development.

Suggested Citation

  • Wagner, Helmut, 2018. "Structural change, rebalancing, and the danger of a middle-income trap in China," CEAMeS Discussion Paper Series 13/2018, University of Hagen, Center for East Asia Macro-economic Studies (CEAMeS).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ceames:132018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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