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Without liberty and justice, what extremes to expect? Two contemporary perspectives

Author

Listed:
  • Miller, Marcus

    (University of Warwick)

  • Zissimos, Ben

    (Exeter University Business School)

Abstract

From a wide-ranging historical survey, Acemoglu and Robinson conclude that the preservation of liberty depends on being in a ‘narrow corridor’ where there is a balance of power between the state and society. We first examine the support Binmore's game-theoretic treatment of Social Contracts provides for such a ‘narrow corridor’ of liberty and justice – and what extremes to expect without them. We also consider how the biological model of Competing Species helps to describe the dynamics of conflicting powers outside the narrow corridor– where, as in contemporary Russia and China, any Social Contracts that exist are neither free nor fair.

Suggested Citation

  • Miller, Marcus & Zissimos, Ben, 2021. "Without liberty and justice, what extremes to expect? Two contemporary perspectives," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1380, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:1380
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Acemoglu,Daron & Robinson,James A., 2009. "Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521671422, May.
    2. Guriev, Sergei & Treisman, Daniel, 2020. "A theory of informational autocracy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 186(C).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    liberty ; social contracts ; repeated games ; Competing Species ; anarchy ; Despotism ; Neofeudalism JEL Classification: C70 ; C73 ; P00 ; Z13;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory

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