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Without liberty and justice, what extremes to expect? Two contemporary perspectives

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  • Miller, Marcus
  • Zissimos, Ben

Abstract

From a wide-ranging historical survey, Acemoglu and Robinson conclude that the preservation of liberty depends on being in a 'narrow corridor' where there is a balance of power between the state and society. We first examine the support Binmore's game-theoretic treatment of Social Contracts provides for such a 'narrow corridor' of liberty and justice â?? and what extremes to expect without them. We also consider how the biological model of Competing Species helps to describe the dynamics of conflicting powers outside the narrow corridorâ?? where, as in contemporary Russia and China, any Social Contracts that exist are neither free nor fair.

Suggested Citation

  • Miller, Marcus & Zissimos, Ben, 2021. "Without liberty and justice, what extremes to expect? Two contemporary perspectives," CEPR Discussion Papers 16695, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:16695
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Acemoglu,Daron & Robinson,James A., 2009. "Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521671422.
    2. Guriev, Sergei & Treisman, Daniel, 2020. "A theory of informational autocracy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 186(C).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Anarchy; Competing Species; Despotism; liberty; Neofeudalism; repeated games; Social Contracts;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • P00 - Economic Systems - - General - - - General
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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