IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwppe/0507012.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Das oeffentliche Auftragswesen im gesamtwirtschaftlichen Zusammenhang

Author

Listed:
  • Heinz Handler

    (Austrian Institute of Economic Research)

Abstract

This paper, written in German language, deals with public procurement policies in the European Union in an overall economic context. Public sector contracts for goods and services make up about one sixth of Community GDP. Governments of all levels tend to rely on local firms when extenting delivery contracts. This may be in conflict with the rules of the EU internal market which, for larger contracts, request competition among bidders. The current essay discusses the possible tensions between competition in the market and the regulation of public procurement. Public contracts have been used to implement additional policy goals, such as social and environmental aspects or to aid small business. The latter goal is often blurred by the tendency to centralise procurement in order to increase the market power of public demand. In general, such a mix of goals may reduce the efficiency of procurement policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Heinz Handler, 2005. "Das oeffentliche Auftragswesen im gesamtwirtschaftlichen Zusammenhang," Public Economics 0507012, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwppe:0507012
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 33. 33 pages, written in German
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/pe/papers/0507/0507012.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Philippe Aghion & Nick Bloom & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt, 2005. "Competition and Innovation: an Inverted-U Relationship," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(2), pages 701-728.
    2. Oecd, 2000. "Centralised and Decentralised Public Procurement," SIGMA Papers 29, OECD Publishing.
    3. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 103-126, October.
    4. Federico Trionfetti, 2000. "Discriminatory Public Procurement and International Trade," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(1), pages 57-76, January.
    5. Francois, Joseph & Nelson, Doug R & Palmeter, David, 1996. "Public Procurement: A Post-Uruguay Round Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 1412, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Handler, Heinz & Burger, Christina, 2002. "Competition and competitiveness in a new economy," MPRA Paper 44944, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Denis Audet, 2003. "Government procurement: A synthesis report," OECD Journal on Budgeting, OECD Publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 149-194.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Heinz Handler, 2015. "Strategic Public Procurement: An Overview. WWWforEurope Policy Paper No. 28," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58552, June.
    2. Simon Wiederhold, 2012. "The Role of Public Procurement in Innovation: Theory and Empirical Evidence," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 43.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Simon Wiederhold, 2012. "The Role of Public Procurement in Innovation: Theory and Empirical Evidence," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 43.
    2. Daniel Yuichi Kono & Stephanie J. Rickard, 2014. "Buying National: Democracy, Public Procurement, and International Trade," International Interactions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 657-682, October.
    3. Schiffbauer, Marc, 2006. "Theoretical and methodological study on the role of public policies in fostering innovation and growth," Papers DYNREG04, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    4. Zerzeri FERIEL, 2016. "Innovation, Cooperation Network and Economic Growth, a Tunisian Case," Journal of Economics Bibliography, KSP Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 53-70, March.
    5. Etro, Federico, 2017. "Research in economics and macroeconomics," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 373-383.
    6. Joscha Beckmann & Marek Endrichs & Rainer Schweickert, 2016. "Government activity and economic growth – one size fits All?," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 429-450, July.
    7. zerzeri, feriel, 2016. "Innovation, cooperation network and economic growth, a Tunisian study," MPRA Paper 68909, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Rao, B. Bhaskara, 2010. "Estimates of the steady state growth rates for selected Asian countries with an extended Solow model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 46-53, January.
    9. Esa Mangeloja, 2004. "Interrelationship of economic growth and regional religious properties," ERSA conference papers ersa04p94, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Atolia, Manoj & Chatterjee, Santanu & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2010. "How misleading is linearization? Evaluating the dynamics of the neoclassical growth model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1550-1571, September.
    11. Pierre‐Richard Agénor, 2009. "Infrastructure Investment and Maintenance Expenditure: Optimal Allocation Rules in a Growing Economy," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(2), pages 233-250, April.
    12. Arcalean, Calin & Glomm, Gerhard & Schiopu, Ioana, 2012. "Growth effects of spatial redistribution policies," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 988-1008.
    13. Gonzalez-Eiras, Martín & Niepelt, Dirk, 2012. "Ageing, government budgets, retirement, and growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 97-115.
    14. Nicholas Bloom & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2015. "Do Private Equity Owned Firms Have Better Management Practices?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(5), pages 442-446, May.
    15. Ingrid Ott & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2006. "Excludable and Non‐excludable Public Inputs: Consequences for Economic Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(292), pages 725-748, November.
    16. Herrmann, Roland & Schröck, Rebecca, 2011. "Determinanten des Innovationserfolgs: eine Analyse mit Scannerdaten für den deutschen Joghurtmarkt," German Journal of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department for Agricultural Economics, vol. 60(03), pages 1-16, August.
    17. Iamsiraroj, Sasi, 2016. "The foreign direct investment–economic growth nexus," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 116-133.
    18. David Owyong & Shandre Thangavelu, 2001. "An empirical study on public capital spillovers from the USA to Canada," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(11), pages 1493-1499.
    19. Jing Xing, 2011. "Does tax structure affect economic growth? Empirical evidence from OECD countries," Working Papers 1120, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
    20. Ingrid Ott & Susanne Soretz, 2006. "Governmental activity, integration, and agglomeration," Working Paper Series in Economics 57, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    public procurement; EU internal market; public demand and competition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • H - Public Economics

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwppe:0507012. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: EconWPA (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.