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A Three Factor Agricultural Production Function: The Case of Canada

Author

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  • Cristina Echevarria

    (University of Saskatchewan)

Abstract

This paper estimates a constant returns to scale agricultural production function of the three basic factors of production. Such a function is a useful tool for macroeconomic, growth, and development studies. It uses the shares approach that Solow used in 1957 and very disaggregated Canadian data. The main results of this paper are that first, in Canada, agriculture is less labour intensive than both services and industry, but capital intensity is similar in the three sectors. Second, the share of land in value added is estimated to be 16%. Third, total factor productivity growth in Canada has been roughly the same--0.3%--in agriculture and manufactures over the period 1971-91.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Echevarria, 2005. "A Three Factor Agricultural Production Function: The Case of Canada," Microeconomics 0510011, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:0510011
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 13
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/mic/papers/0510/0510011.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bernard, Andrew B & Jones, Charles I, 1996. "Productivity across Industries and Countries: Time Series Theory and Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 135-146, February.
    2. repec:hoo:wpaper:e-92-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Matsuyama, Kiminori, 1992. "Agricultural productivity, comparative advantage, and economic growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 317-334, December.
    4. Stockman, Alan C., 1988. "Sectoral and national aggregate disturbances to industrial output in seven European countries," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 387-409.
    5. Costello, Donna M, 1993. "A Cross-Country, Cross-Industry Comparison of Productivity Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 207-222, April.
    6. John Laitner, 2000. "Structural Change and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 545-561.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Bilson Darku & Stavroula Malla & Kien C. Tran, 2016. "Sources and Measurement of Agricultural Productivity and Efficiency in Canadian Provinces: Crops and Livestock," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 64(1), pages 49-70, March.
    2. Antonio Saravia & Carlos Gustavo Machicado & Felix Rioja, 2014. "Productivity, Structural Change and Latin American Development," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 610-624, August.
    3. Dessy, Sylvain & Mbiekop, Flaubert & Pallage, Stéphane, 2010. "On the mechanics of trade-induced structural transformation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 251-264, March.
    4. Berthold Herrendorf & Todd Schoellman, 2015. "Why is Measured Productivity so Low in Agriculture?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(4), pages 1003-1022, October.
    5. E. Cristina Echevarria, 2008. "International trade and the sectoral composition of production," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 192-206, January.
    6. JunJie Wu & Christian Langpap, 2015. "The Price and Welfare Effects of Biofuel Mandates and Subsidies," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(1), pages 35-57, September.
    7. repec:eee:reveco:v:51:y:2017:i:c:p:328-341 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Wenbiao Cai, 2017. "We See Thee Rise: Quantifying Farm Size Expansion in Canada," Departmental Working Papers 2017-01, The University of Winnipeg, Department of Economics.
    9. Honma, Satoshi & Yoshida, Yushi, 2014. "An Account of Pollution Emission Embodied in Global Trade: PGT1 and PGT2 Database," MPRA Paper 57489, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Satoshi Honma & Yushi Yoshida, 2012. "An Empirical Investigation of the Balance of Embodied Emission in Trade:Industry Structure and Emission Abatement," Discussion Papers 57, Kyushu Sangyo University, Faculty of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agricultural economics; agriculture production function; macroeconomics;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design

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