IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpmi/0306004.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Satisfaction and Learning: an experimental game to measure happiness

Author

Listed:
  • Marco Novarese

    (Centre for Cognitive Economics - Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria, Italy)

  • Salvatore Rizzello

    (Centre for Cognitive Economics - Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria, Italy)

Abstract

This paper aims to illustrate the results of an experimental analysis in which - along with organizational coordination - the participants' level of satisfaction was measured. As in the analysis of individual happiness, satisfaction is here measured by explicitly asking players. A series of interesting results emerges: (1) it is possible to measure satisfaction in an experiment; (2) as expected, satisfaction is mainly affected by the score; given this value, there are, nevertheless, other relevant elements affecting it; (3) experience and learning seem also to play a relevant role in influencing the evolution of satisfaction. In fact, a training in a situation in which coordination is difficult, improve the mean levels of satisfaction in the next period. A training in a situation in which players have to interact with strongly opportunistic partners, make players' satisfaction more penalized by the opportunism of the others. These results can be related to the cognitive literature on individual decision making and on Herbert Simon's satisficing model.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Novarese & Salvatore Rizzello, 2003. "Satisfaction and Learning: an experimental game to measure happiness," Microeconomics 0306004, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:0306004
    Note: Type of Document - PDF; prepared on IBM PC ; to print on HP;
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/mic/papers/0306/0306004.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ulrich Witt, 2006. "Evolutionary Economics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2006-05, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    2. Selten, Reinhard, 1999. "What is Bounded Rationality? Paper prepared for the Dahlem Conferen," Discussion Paper Serie B 454, University of Bonn, Germany.
    3. M. Posch & A. Pichler & K. Sigmund, 1998. "The Efficiency of Adapting Aspiration Levels," Working Papers ir98103, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
    4. Tversky, Amos & Kahneman, Daniel, 1986. "Rational Choice and the Framing of Decisions," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(4), pages 251-278, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. McBride, Michael, 2010. "Money, happiness, and aspirations: An experimental study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 262-276, June.
    2. Estrada, Fernando, 2010. "Economics and Rationality of organizations: an approach to the work of Herbert A. Simon," MPRA Paper 21811, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Novarese, Marco, 2007. "Individual learning in different social contexts," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 15-35, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    happiness; experimental economics; satisficing; evolution;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:0306004. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: http://econwpa.repec.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.