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How to Make Scientists Agree - An Evolutionary Betting Mechanism

Author

Listed:
  • Tilman Slembeck

    (University of St.Gallen)

Abstract

This paper proposes an evolutionary betting mechanism that refers to scientists' academic reputation. The mechanism provides incentives for theoretical and empirical researchers to work on joint projects, thereby producing more general findings and stylized facts that can be used in giving economic policy advice.

Suggested Citation

  • Tilman Slembeck, 2000. "How to Make Scientists Agree - An Evolutionary Betting Mechanism," Method and Hist of Econ Thought 0004004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmh:0004004
    Note: Type of Document - PDF; prepared on IBM PC; to print on HP/PostScript; pages: 5 ; figures: none. forthcoming in KYKLOS:
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/mhet/papers/0004/0004004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alston, Richard M & Kearl, J R & Vaughan, Michael B, 1992. "Is There a Consensus among Economists in the 1990's?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 203-209, May.
    2. Frey, Bruno S, et al, 1984. "Consensus and Dissension among Economists: An Empirical Inquiry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(5), pages 986-994, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    methodology; evolution; betting; stylized facts; economic policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology

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