IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpma/0508027.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Efficacy of Monetary Policy and Limited Asset Market Participation

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Di Bartolomeo

    (Università di Roma La Sapienza)

  • Lorenza Rossi

    (Università di Roma Tor Vergata)

Abstract

A common wisdom argues that limited asset market participation reduces the efficacy of monetary policy. This paper investigates this issue in the context of the New Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models. Despite limited participation actually reduces effects of interest rate policies by reducing the effect on inter-temporal allocation of consumption, we find an opposite result. Monetary policy becomes more effective as long as the share of agents who cannot access to the financial market increases. The reason has a very Keynesian flavor.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Lorenza Rossi, 2005. "Efficacy of Monetary Policy and Limited Asset Market Participation," Macroeconomics 0508027, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0508027 Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 9
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/mac/papers/0508/0508027.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. V. Anton Muscatelli & Patrizio Tirelli & Carmine Trescroci, 2003. "Fiscal and Monetary policy Interactions in a New Keynesian Model with Liquidity Constraints," Working Papers 2005_19, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow, revised Apr 2005.
    2. N. Gregory Mankiw, 2000. "The Savers-Spenders Theory of Fiscal Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 120-125.
    3. Ahmad, Yamin, 2005. "Money market rates and implied CCAPM rates: some international evidence," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-5), pages 699-729, September.
    4. Jordi Galí & J. David López-Salido, 2003. "Rule-of-Thumb Consumers and the Design of Interest Rate Rules," Working Papers 104, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    5. Mankiw, N. Gregory & Zeldes, Stephen P., 1991. "The consumption of stockholders and nonstockholders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 97-112, March.
    6. Michael Woodford, 2001. "The Taylor Rule and Optimal Monetary Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 232-237.
    7. Amato, Jeffery D. & Laubach, Thomas, 2003. "Rule-of-thumb behaviour and monetary policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(5), pages 791-831, October.
    8. Bernanke, Ben S & Woodford, Michael, 1997. "Inflation Forecasts and Monetary Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(4), pages 653-684, November.
    9. Olivier Blanchard & Andrei Shleifer, 2001. "Federalism With and Without Political Centralization: China Versus Russia," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(4), pages 1-8.
    10. N. Gregory Mankiw, 2000. "The Savers-Spenders Theory of Fiscal Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 120-125.
    11. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 2000. "Habit Formation in Consumption and Its Implications for Monetary-Policy Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 367-390.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Camelia Ioana Ucenic & Laura Bacali, 2008. "The Impact of the Advance of SME's for the Romanian Economy," Working Papers 0804, University of Crete, Department of Economics.
    2. Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Lorenza Rossi & Massimiliano Tancioni, 2011. "Monetary policy, rule-of-thumb consumers and external habits: a G7 comparison," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(21), pages 2721-2738.
    3. repec:eee:jmacro:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:39-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Beqiraj Elton & Di Bartolomeo Giovanni & Di Pietro Marco, 2016. "Financial crises, limited asset market participation, and banks balance sheet constraints," wp.comunite 00127, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
    5. Andrea Colciago, 2011. "Rule‐of‐Thumb Consumers Meet Sticky Wages," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 325-353, March.
    6. Di Bartolomeo, Giovanni & Manzo, Marco, 2007. "Do tax distortions lead to more indeterminacy? A New Keynesian perspective," MPRA Paper 3549, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Albonico, Alice & Rossi, Lorenza, 2017. "Inflation bias and markup shocks in a LAMP model with strategic interaction of monetary and fiscal policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, pages 39-55.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumers’ heterogeneity; efficacy of monetary policy; rule- of-thumb.;

    JEL classification:

    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0508027. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: http://econwpa.repec.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.