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Technological Developments and their Effects on World Trade: Any Implications for Governments?

Listed author(s):
  • Aykut Kibritcioglu

    (Ankara University)

This paper summarizes new developments in world trade, technological changes worldwide and their implications for recent theoretical studies in economics. After defining the economic globalization and schematizing its relations with international trade, economic growth and technological change, dramatic increases in world trade in goods, services and financial assets in last decades are statistically documented in Chapter 2. Theoretical studies of economists on international trade and economic growth are certainly affected by the fact that the actual technological developments have strong implications for world trade and output growth. In Chapter 3, this new perspectives in economics are discussed. Last chapter presents some concluding remarks with special reference to the role of governments in the process of technological development within an increasingly globalizing world economy.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/it/papers/0108/0108006.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series International Trade with number 0108006.

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Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: 06 Sep 2001
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0108006
Note: Type of Document - PDF; prepared on PC; to print on any printer by using A4-sized paper; pages: 17 ; figures: included
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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