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The Ebbinghaus Effect and the Implications of Net Learning for the Performance of Production Systems, with Some Experimental Results

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  • V. Heinrich Amavilah

    (Glendale College)

Abstract

This abstract will be reformatted upon A simple Ebbinghaus model suggests that the policy implications of gross learning for the performance of production systems can be misleading. The rates of net learning tend to be transitory such that knowledge accumulation and diffusion processes thereof take longer to bear fruit than conventional learning models would indicate. Consequently, continuous retooling and retraining of production systems are necessary conditions for offsetting the effects of forgetting on gross learning.

Suggested Citation

  • V. Heinrich Amavilah, 2003. "The Ebbinghaus Effect and the Implications of Net Learning for the Performance of Production Systems, with Some Experimental Results," Experimental 0307002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpex:0307002
    Note: Type of Document - Word; prepared on IBM PC - PC; to print on HP/PostScript; pages: 16 ; figures: request from author. I never published this paper and now I would like to share it with wider readership.
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gagnon, Roger J. & Sheu, Chwen, 2000. "The impact of learning, forgetting and capacity profiles on the acquisition of advanced technology," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 51-76, February.
    2. K. J. Arrow, 1971. "The Economic Implications of Learning by Doing," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: F. H. Hahn (ed.), Readings in the Theory of Growth, chapter 11, pages 131-149, Palgrave Macmillan.
    3. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
    4. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 369-405.
    6. C. Lanier Benkard, 1999. "Learning and Forgetting: The Dynamics of Aircraft Production," NBER Working Papers 7127, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Arifovic, Jasmina & Bullard, James & Duffy, John, 1997. "The Transition from Stagnation to Growth: An Adaptive Learning Approach," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 185-209, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amavilah, Voxi Heinrich, 2014. "Human Knowledge and a Commonsensical Measure of Human Capital: A Proposal," MPRA Paper 57670, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ebbinghaus effect; gross and net learning; forgetting;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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