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Inequality-Driven Growth: Unveiling Aggregation Effects in Growth Equations

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  • Pedro H. Albuquerque

    (Texas A&M International University)

Abstract

It is well known from nonlinear aggregation theory that distributions play a central role in the determination of aggregate relations. This paper establishes a bridge between the aggregation and the inequality and growth literature by applying a log-linear aggregation method to a simple heterogeneous AK growth model. The aggregation effect is explicitly captured in the growth equation by the changes of the mean logarithmic deviation (MLD or Theil’s second measure) of the income, implying that increases in income inequality may be unambiguously associated with temporary increases in a country’s growth rate, in agreement with the empirical findings of Forbes (AER, 2000). Consequently, empirical studies of the long-run effects of income inequality may suffer from aggregation bias if the temporary effects of the MLD changes are not considered. The accelerated growth episodes observed in Brazil and China demonstrate that the increase in income inequality may have resulted in substantial temporary increases in the aggregate growth rates experienced by those countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Pedro H. Albuquerque, 2005. "Inequality-Driven Growth: Unveiling Aggregation Effects in Growth Equations," Development and Comp Systems 0511028, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0511028
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cesaroni, T. & D'Elia, E. & De Santis, R., 2019. "Inequality in EMU: is there a core periphery dualism?," The Journal of Economic Asymmetries, Elsevier, vol. 20(C).
    2. Niko Gobbin & Glenn Rayp & Dirk Van de gaer, 2007. "Inequality And Growth: From Micro Theory To Macro Empirics," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 54(4), pages 508-530, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality; Growth; Income Distribution; Aggregation; Heterogeneity; AK Model; Brazil; China;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General

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