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A CGE assessment of a university's effects on a regional economy - supply-side versus demand-side effects

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  • James Giesecke

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  • John Madden

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Abstract

In recent years many universities have commissioned studies of the effect of their institution on the local economy. Typically these impact studies have concentrated on the demand-side stimuli to the regional economy that the university generates. Normally, the studies are undertaken with comparative-static input-output models. The present study employs a dynamic multiregional computable general equilibrium model to investigate supply-side as well as demand-side effects. There are a range of supply-side effects that have been investigated in the spatial econometrics literature. The supply-side impacts of the university that we examine in particular are a rise in the average skill level of the local workforce, and successful R&D outcomes. CGE modelling allows simulation of the associated productivity effects, while the dynamic features of the model allow for consequent effects on the region's population and capital stock growth rates to be taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • James Giesecke & John Madden, 2005. "A CGE assessment of a university's effects on a regional economy - supply-side versus demand-side effects," ERSA conference papers ersa05p436, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p436
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    1. Adams, Philip D. & Dixon, Peter B. & McDonald, Daina & Meagher, G. A. & Parmenter, Brian R., 1994. "Forecasts for the Australian economy using the MONASH model," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 557-571, December.
    2. Anselin, Luc & Varga, Attila & Acs, Zoltan, 1997. "Local Geographic Spillovers between University Research and High Technology Innovations," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 422-448, November.
    3. Jaffe, Adam B, 1989. "Real Effects of Academic Research," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 957-970.
    4. Matthew W. Peter & Mark Horridge & G.A.Meagher & Fazana Naqvi & B.R.Parmenter, 1996. "The Theoretical Structure of MONASH-MRF," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers op-85, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    5. Bound, John & Groen, Jeffrey & Kezdi, G.Gabor & Turner, Sarah, 2004. "Trade in university training: cross-state variation in the production and stock of college-educated labor," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 143-173.
    6. Luc Anselin, 2000. "Geographical Spillovers and University Research: A Spatial EconometricPerspective," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 501-515.
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