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Maritime Trade, Biological Invasions, and the Properties of Alternate Inspection Regimes

  • Amit Batabyal

    ()

  • Hamid Beladi

    ()

  • Won Koo

    ()

We analyze the problem of preventing biological invasions caused by ships transporting internationally traded goods between countries and continents. Specifically, we ask the following question: Should a port manager have a small number of inspectors inspect arriving ships less stringently or should this manager have a large number of inspectors inspect the same ships more stringently? We use a simple queuing-theoretic framework and show that if decreasing the economic cost of regulation is very important then it makes more sense for the port manager to choose the less stringent inspection regime. In contrast, if reducing the damage from biological invasions is more salient then the port manager ought to pick the more stringent inspection regime.

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu-wien.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa05/papers/164.pdf
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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa05p164.

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Date of creation: Aug 2005
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p164
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  1. Chad Settle & Jason E Shogren, 2002. "Modeling Native-Exotic Species within Yellowstone Lake," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1323-1328.
  2. Beladi, Hamid & Batabyal, Amitrajeet A., 2004. "International Trade And Biological Invasions: A Queuing Theoretic Analysis Of The Prevention Problem," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19912, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Richard D. Horan & Charles Perrings & Frank Lupi & Erwin H. Bulte, 2002. "Biological Pollution Prevention Strategies under Ignorance:The Case of Invasive Species," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1303-1310.
  4. Barbier, Edward B., 2001. "A note on the economics of biological invasions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 197-202, November.
  5. Lars J. Olson & Santanu Roy, 2002. "The Economics of Controlling a Stochastic Biological Invasion," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1311-1316.
  6. Mark Eiswerth & Wayne Johnson, 2002. "Managing Nonindigenous Invasive Species: Insights from Dynamic Analysis," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 23(3), pages 319-342, November.
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