IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Capitalising the Value of Free Schools: The Impact of Supply Constraints and Uncertainty

  • Paul Cheshire

    ()

  • Stephen Sheppard

    ()

There has been a growing literature in both the US (for example Haurin and Brasington 1996, and Black 1999) and the UK (for example Gibbons & Machin, 2001) that estimates the way in which school quality is capitalised into house prices. Cheshire and Sheppard 1995 and 1999 have estimated hedonic models in which the quality of the secondary school to which a household was assigned was a significant variable. This provided evidence that the value of secondary school quality was being capitalised into the price of houses. In contrast Gibbons and Machin concluded that primary schools had an identifiable and significant price associated with their quality but that secondary schools did not. Their study did not have data for individual houses but used post-code sector data and then various techniques to standardised for all but one variable: either the notional primary school catchment area or the notional secondary school catchment area. Each of these analyses is predicated on the assumption that the value of local schools should be reflected in the value of houses. We expect variation in the capitalised price of a given school quality at either primary or secondary level according to the elasticity of supply of ‘school quality’ in the local market. This will vary systematically between and perhaps within cities and this paper explores the sources and the impact of such variations as well as the impact of model specification. Using an hedonic model and data from 1999-2000, we estimate values attached to both secondary school and primary school quality. The results support the conclusion that both secondary and primary school quality is capitalised into the market price of houses and that the capitalisation of school quality is discounted within the context of an urban area that is tightly constrained by land use planning in areas where new construction is concentrated. We also find evidence that appropriate model specification is imperative since bias is evident both when key neighbourhood characteristics are omitted and if the actual allocation of addresses to schools is not included. JEL: D12; H4; I2; R5

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www-sre.wu-wien.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa03/cdrom/papers/8.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa03p8.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Aug 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa03p8
Contact details of provider: Postal: Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria
Web page: http://www.ersa.org

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Cheshire, Paul & Sheppard, Stephen, 1995. "On the Price of Land and the Value of Amenities," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 62(246), pages 247-67, May.
  2. BRUECKNER, Jan K. & THISSE, Jacques-François & ZENOU, Yves, . "Why is central Paris rich and downtown Detroit poor? An amenity-based theory," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1370, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  3. Brasington, David M., 2002. "Edge versus center: finding common ground in the capitalization debate," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 524-541, November.
  4. Sandra E. Black, 1999. "Do Better Schools Matter? Parental Valuation Of Elementary Education," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(2), pages 577-599, May.
  5. Christian A. L. Hilber & Christopher J. Mayer, . "Land Supply, House Price Capitalization, and Local Spending on Schools," Zell/Lurie Center Working Papers 392, Wharton School Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center, University of Pennsylvania.
  6. Steve Gibbons & Stephen Machin, 2001. "Valuing Primary Schools," CEE Discussion Papers 0015, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  7. Haurin, Donald R. & Brasington, David, 1996. "School Quality and Real House Prices: Inter- and Intrametropolitan Effects," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 351-368, December.
  8. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
  9. Cheshire, Paul & Sheppard, Stephen, 1998. "Estimating the Demand for Housing, Land, and Neighbourhood Characteristics," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(3), pages 357-82, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa03p8. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gunther Maier)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.