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An Integrated Approach to Climate Change, Income Distribution, Employment, and Economic Growth

Listed author(s):
  • Lance Taylor
  • Armon Rezai

    ()

    (Vienna University of Economics and Business, Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria)

  • Duncan K. Foley

A demand-driven growth model involving capital accumulation and the dynamics of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration is set up to examine macroeconomic issues raised by global warming, e.g. effects on output and employment of rising levels of GHG; offsets by mitigation; relationships among energy use and labor productivity, income distribution, and growth; the economic significance of the Jevons and other paradoxes; sustainable consumption and possible reductions in employment; and sources of instability and cyclicality implicit in the twodimensional dynamical system. The emphasis is on the combination on biophysical limits and Post- Keynesian growth theory and the qualitative patterns of system adjustment and the dynamics that emerge.

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File URL: http://epub.wu.ac.at/4557/1/EcolEcon_WorkingPaper_2015_3.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute of Ecological Economics in its series Ecological Economics Papers with number ieep3.

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Date of creation: Jun 2015
Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwiee:ieep3
Note: PDF-Document
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Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria

Web page: http://www.wu.ac.at/ecolecon/

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  1. Amartya K. Sen, 1966. "Peasants and Dualism with or without Surplus Labor," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 425-425.
  2. Rezai, Armon & Taylor, Lance & Mechler, Reinhard, 2013. "Ecological macroeconomics: An application to climate change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 69-76.
  3. Campiglio, Emanuele, 2016. "Beyond carbon pricing: The role of banking and monetary policy in financing the transition to a low-carbon economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 220-230.
  4. Fontana, Giuseppe & Sawyer, Malcolm, 2016. "Towards post-Keynesian ecological macroeconomics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 186-195.
  5. Howarth, Richard B. & Kennedy, Kevin, 2016. "Economic growth, inequality, and well-being," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 231-236.
  6. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.
  7. Naqvi, Syed Ali Asjad, 2015. "Modeling Growth, Distribution, and the Environment in a Stock-Flow Consistent Framework," Ecological Economic Papers 4468, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  8. Duncan Foley & Lance Taylor, 2013. "The Social Cost of Carbon Emissions," SCEPA policy note series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2013-2, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
  9. Laura Carvalho & Armon Rezai, 2016. "Personal income inequality and aggregate demand," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 491-505.
  10. Foley, Duncan K. & Rezai, Armon & Taylor, Lance, 2013. "The social cost of carbon emissions: Seven propositions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 90-97.
  11. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2015. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economic Papers 4564, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  12. Jackson, Tim & Victor, Peter A., 2016. "Does slow growth lead to rising inequality? Some theoretical reflections and numerical simulations," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 206-219.
  13. Armon Rezai & Duncan Foley & Lance Taylor, 2012. "Global warming and economic externalities," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 49(2), pages 329-351, February.
  14. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 111, WWWforEurope.
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