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Do Maternal Investments in Human Capital Affect Childrens' Academic Achievement?

Children of educated mothers fare better on a variety of educational outcomes. However, little research has been done on the effects of human capital investments undertaken by mothers with children at home. Such investments have a theoretically ambiguous effect on child outcomes, since human capital investment reduces time spent with children but may have positive spillover effects on child investment. Using childand sibling-fixed effects models to deal with unobserved heterogeneity, we find that cumulative maternal schooling undertaken during a child's lifetime has significant positive effects on child outcomes, and that negative time allocation effects are minimal.

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File URL: http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/schmidtmoore_schmidt.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Williams College in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 2004-13.

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Length: 54 pages
Date of creation: May 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2004-13
Contact details of provider: Postal: Williamstown, MA 01267
Phone: 413 597 2476
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  1. Jane Waldfogel & Wen-Jui Han & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, 2002. "The effects of early maternal employment on child cognitive development," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 369-392, May.
  2. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe & James Spaulding, 1991. "Childhood events and circumstances influencing high school completion," Demography, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 133-157, February.
  3. Phillip B. Levine & David J. Zimmerman, 2000. "Children's Welfare Exposure and Subsequent Development," JCPR Working Papers 130, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  4. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 257-298 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Aughinbaugh, Alison & Gittleman, Maury, 2004. "Maternal employment and adolescent risky behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 815-838, July.
  6. Hungerford, Thomas & Solon, Gary, 1987. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 175-77, February.
  7. Francine D. Blau & Adam J. Grossberg, 1990. "Maternal Labor Supply and Children's Cognitive Development," NBER Working Papers 3536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Griliches, Zvi, 1979. "Sibling Models and Data in Economics: Beginnings of a Survey," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages S37-64, October.
  9. Charles L. Baum II, 2003. "Does Early Maternal Employment Harm Child Development? An Analysis of the Potential Benefits of Leave Taking," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 381-408, April.
  10. Jaeger, David A & Page, Marianne E, 1996. "Degrees Matter: New Evidence on Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 733-40, November.
  11. David M. Blau, 1999. "The Effect of Child Care Characteristics on Child Development," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(4), pages 786-822.
  12. Blackburn, McKinley L & Neumark, David, 1995. "Are OLS Estimates of the Return to Schooling Biased Downward? Another Look," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 217-30, May.
  13. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
  14. Mark R. Rosenzweig & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1994. "Are There Increasing Returns to the Intergenerational Production of Human Capital? Maternal Schooling and Child Intellectual Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 670-693.
  15. Peter H. Lindert, 1977. "Sibling Position and Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 12(2), pages 198-219.
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