IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wes/weswpa/2005-011.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Soft Related Lending: A Tale of Two Korean Banks

Author

Listed:
  • John P. Bonin

    () (Economics Deapartment, Wesleyan University)

  • Masami Imai

    () (Economics and East Asian Studies, Wesleyan University)

Abstract

In this paper, we present indirect evidence that the IMF’s insistence on foreign control of two large nationwide Korean banks in exchange for short-term support during the 1997 financial crisis helped restrain soft related lending practices. News signaling the likely sale of a bank to a foreign financial institution yields an average daily decrease of about 2% in the stock price of related borrowers. News indicating difficulty in finding an interested foreign investor generates an increase in the stock price of related borrowers of about the same magnitude. These signals have larger impacts on less-profitable, less-liquid, and more bank-dependent firms.

Suggested Citation

  • John P. Bonin & Masami Imai, 2005. "Soft Related Lending: A Tale of Two Korean Banks," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2005-011, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wes:weswpa:2005-011
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://repec.wesleyan.edu/pdf/jbonin/2005011_bonin.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 2005. "Unnatural Selection: Perverse Incentives and the Misallocation of Credit in Japan," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1144-1166, September.
    2. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Guillermo Zamarripa, 2003. "Related Lending," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(1), pages 231-268.
    3. Raghuram G. Rajan & Luigi Zingales, 1998. "Which Capitalism? Lessons Form The East Asian Crisis," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 11(3), pages 40-48.
    4. Laeven, Luc, 2001. "Insider Lending and Bank Ownership: The Case of Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 207-229, June.
    5. Lamoreaux, Naomi R., 1986. "Banks, Kinship, and Economic Development: The New England Case," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(03), pages 647-667, September.
    6. Cull, Robert & Matesova, Jana & Shirley, Mary, 2002. "Ownership and the Temptation to Loot: Evidence from Privatized Firms in the Czech Republic," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 1-24, March.
    7. A. Craig MacKinlay, 1997. "Event Studies in Economics and Finance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 13-39, March.
    8. Yongil Jeon & Stephen Miller, 2004. "The effect of the Asian financial crisis on the performance of Korean nationwide banks," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(5), pages 351-360.
    9. Bae, Kee-Hong & Kang, Jun-Koo & Lim, Chan-Woo, 2002. "The value of durable bank relationships: evidence from Korean banking shocks," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 181-214, May.
    10. Djankov, Simeon & Jindra, Jan & Klapper, Leora F., 2005. "Corporate valuation and the resolution of bank insolvency in East Asia," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(8-9), pages 2095-2118, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Boubakri, Narjess & Cosset, Jean-Claude & Guedhami, Omrane, 2009. "From state to private ownership: Issues from strategic industries," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 367-379, February.
    2. Patrick Honohan & Thorsten Beck, 2007. "Making Finance Work for Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6626, July.
    3. Beck, Thorsten, 2006. "Creating an efficient financial system : challenges in a global economy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3856, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Related Lending; Korean Banks; Privatization; Globalization;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wes:weswpa:2005-011. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Manolis Kaparakis). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/edwesus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.