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Creating and using fiscal space for accelerated development in Liberia

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  • Lofgren, Hans

Abstract

This paper presents simulations for the period 2013-2030 of measures that permit increased spending on infrastructure and human development, the priority areas in Liberia's 2013-2017"Agenda for Transformation"and for its national vision, Liberia Rising 2030. The simulations are carried out with a Liberian version of MAMS (Maquette for Millennium Development Goals Simulations), a Computable General Equilibrium model. According to the results, among the key sources of fiscal space, foreign grants generate the best outcomes followed by improved government allocative efficiency. Taxes tend to involve trade-offs since they reduce resources for private consumption and investment, both of which tend to contribute to stronger macro and Millennium Development Goals performance. Increased foreign borrowing is less attractive since, in order to make a substantial difference, it would quickly add to the foreign debt, making the economy more crisis-prone and less flexible. The preferred balance between different uses of fiscal space depends on payoffs from different government functions, typically unknown or only appearing with a lag. Under the parameters used in the simulations, determined in light of fragmentary evidence, the outcomes were marginally stronger under a balanced approach with scaling up of both infrastructure and human development services. Balanced expansion may also contribute to efficiency and be easier for political reasons. A final finding is that it is possible to consider fiscal space issues in isolation from the mining sector: simulations suggest that the marginal effects of creating additional fiscal space are very similar irrespective of the level of mining export prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Lofgren, Hans, 2013. "Creating and using fiscal space for accelerated development in Liberia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6678, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6678
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jack, William & Lewis, Maureen, 2009. "Health investments and economic growth : macroeconomic evidence and microeconomic foundations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4877, The World Bank.
    2. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    3. Easterly, William, 2009. "How the Millennium Development Goals are Unfair to Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 26-35, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matteo G. Richiardi, 2015. "Liberia.Expanding formal employment through labour market reforms," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 144, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    2. World Bank, 2013. "Liberia Public Expenditure Review : Options for Fiscal Space Enlargement," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16779, The World Bank.
    3. World Bank Group, 2014. "The Economic Impact of the 2014 Ebola Epidemic : Short- and Medium-Term Estimates for West Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20592.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Theory&Research; Debt Markets; Banks&Banking Reform; Emerging Markets; Access to Finance;

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