IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/6511.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Connection charges and electricity access in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Golumbeanu, Raluca
  • Barnes, Douglas

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa trails other regions in providing access to electricity for poor urban and rural residents. This poor performance can be linked to various factors, including political interference in utility policy, higher investment costs and lower profitability of extending service to rural areas. But a major obstacle to wider access is the high charges consumers must pay to connect to the electricity network. The connection charges in Sub-Saharan Africa are among the highest in the world, which has resulted in low rates of electrification in many countries. This paper reviews ways to improve electrification rates by addressing the issue of high connection charges. Essential to the success of such efforts is concurrent political commitment to identify, examine, and implement various low-cost electrification approaches and financing solutions as part of a broad plan to improve access. Electricity companies can lower their connection-related costs, and thus consumer charges, by using a variety of low-cost technologies and materials in distribution networks and household connections; making bulk purchases of materials; and adjusting technical standards to reflect the lower loads of households that use a minimum amount of electricity. Strategies for lowering connection charges may also include spreading charges over a reasonable period, rolling them into monthly service payments, subsidizing connections, or amortizing them through loans. Lowering connection charges is not the only step, but it is an essential part of any strategy for addressing the electricity access gap between rich and poor households in Sub-Saharan Africa, a gap that denies millions of poor Africans the benefits of electricity.

Suggested Citation

  • Golumbeanu, Raluca & Barnes, Douglas, 2013. "Connection charges and electricity access in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6511, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6511
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2013/06/27/000158349_20130627091637/Rendered/PDF/WPS6511.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. B. Kelsey Jack & Grant Smith, 2016. "Charging Ahead: Prepaid Electricity Metering in South Africa," NBER Working Papers 22895, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. repec:eee:enepol:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:278-287 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:eneeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:167-181 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Independent Evaluation Group, 2015. "World Bank Group Support to Electricity Access, FY2000-2014," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22953.
    5. Sharma, Tarun & Balachandra, P., 2015. "Benchmarking sustainability of Indian electricity system: An indicator approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 206-220.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy Production and Transportation; Access to Finance; E-Business; Engineering; Electric Power;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6511. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.