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Food crisis, household welfare and HIV/AIDS treatment : evidence from Mozambique

Author

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  • de Walque, Damien
  • Kazianga, Harounan
  • Over, Mead
  • Vaillant, Julia

Abstract

Using panel data from Mozambique collected in 2007 and 2008, the authors explore the impact of the food crisis on the welfare of households living with HIV/AIDS. The analysis finds that there has been a real deterioration of welfare in terms of income, food consumption, and nutritional status in Mozambique between 2007 and 2008, among both HIV and comparison households. However, HIV households have not suffered more from the crisis than others. Results on the evolution of labor force participation suggest that initiation of treatment and better services in health facilities have counter-balanced the effect of the crisis by improving the health of patients and their labor force participation. In addition, the authors look at the effect of the change in welfare on the frequency of visits to a health facility of patients and on their treatment outcomes. Both variables can proxy for adherence to treatment. This is a particularly crucial issue as it affects both the health of the patient and public health, because sub-optimal adherence leads to the development of resistant forms of the virus. The paper finds no effect of the change in welfare on the frequency of visits, but does find that people who experienced a negative income shock also experienced a reduction or a slower progression in treatment outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • de Walque, Damien & Kazianga, Harounan & Over, Mead & Vaillant, Julia, 2011. "Food crisis, household welfare and HIV/AIDS treatment : evidence from Mozambique," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5522, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5522
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    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2011/01/05/000158349_20110105143534/Rendered/PDF/WPS5522.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Axel Demenet, 2016. "Health Shocks and Permanent Income Loss: the Household Business Channel," Working Papers DT/2016/11, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Disease Control&Prevention; Food&Beverage Industry; Gender and Health; Food Security;

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