IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/3036.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Telecommunications reform in Malawi

Author

Listed:
  • Clarke,George R.*Gebreab, Frew A.*Mgombelo, Henr

Abstract

In 1998 the Government of Malawi decided to reform its telecommunications sector. Although the reform was ambitious in some ways, it was modest when compared with the most ambitious reforms adopted elsewhere in Sub-Saharan Africa. The two main accomplishments were splitting the incumbent fixed line monopoly, the Malawi Post and Telecommunications Corporation, into two companies-Malawi Telecommunications Limited (MTL) and Malawi Post Corporation (MPC)-and issuing two new cellular licenses to two new private entrants. In addition, the Government also established a new regulator which was separate from, but heavily dependent on, the Ministry of Information and liberalized entry in value-added and Internet services. However, the Government had neither privatized the fixed-line telecommunications operator nor introduced competition in fixed-line services by the end of 2002. Clarke, Gebreab, and Mgombelo discuss sector performance before reform, details of the reform, the political motivation for reform, and events in the five years following the reform. The reform yielded mixed results. Although cellular penetration and Internet use expanded dramatically following reform, prices increased, especially for cellular calls, and fixed-line penetration remains low by regional standards.

Suggested Citation

  • Clarke,George R.*Gebreab, Frew A.*Mgombelo, Henr, 2003. "Telecommunications reform in Malawi," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3036, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3036
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/946981468776800237/pdf/multi0page.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Shirley, Mary M & Xu, Lixin Colin, 2001. "Empirical Effects of Performance Contracts: Evidence from China," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 168-200, April.
    2. Azam, Jean-Paul & Dia, Magueye & N'Guessan, Tchetche, 2002. "Telecommunications sector reforms in Senegal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2894, The World Bank.
    3. Shirley, Mary M. & Tusubira, F.F. & Gebreab, Frew & Haggarty, Luke, 2002. "Telecommunications reform in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2864, The World Bank.
    4. World Bank, 2002. "World Development Indicators 2002," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 13921, December.
    5. Shirley, Mary M & Xu, Lixin Colin, 1998. "Information, Incentives, and Commitment: An Empirical Analysis of Contracts between Government and State Enterprises," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 358-378, October.
    6. Laffont, Jean-Jacques & N'Guessan, Tchetche, 2002. "Telecommuications reform in Cote d'Ivoire," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2895, The World Bank.
    7. Haggarty, Luke & Shirley, Mary M. & Wallsten, Scott, 2003. "Telecommunication reform in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2983, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. El-Haddad, Amirah, 2017. "Welfare gains from utility reforms in Egyptian telecommunications," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-26.
    2. George R.G. Clarke & Katrina Kosec & Scott Wallsten, 2009. "Has private participation in water and sewerage improved coverage? Empirical evidence from Latin America," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 327-361.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. El-Haddad, Amirah, 2017. "Welfare gains from utility reforms in Egyptian telecommunications," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-26.
    2. Recanatini, Francesca & Wallsten, Scott J. & Lixin Colin Xu, 2000. "Surveying surveys and questioning questions - learning from World Bank experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2307, The World Bank.
    3. Chhibber, Ajay, 2021. "India's Interventionist State: Reduce Its Scope and Increase Its Capability," MPRA Paper 105711, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Feb 2021.
    4. George R.G. Clarke & Katrina Kosec & Scott Wallsten, 2009. "Has private participation in water and sewerage improved coverage? Empirical evidence from Latin America," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 327-361.
    5. O'Connor, Neale G. & Deng, Johnny & Luo, Yadong, 2006. "Political constraints, organization design and performance measurement in China's state-owned enterprises," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 157-177, February.
    6. Hu, Fang & Tan, Weiqiang & Xin, Qingquan & Yang, Sixian, 2013. "How do market forces affect executive compensation in Chinese state-owned enterprises?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 78-87.
    7. Chhibber, Ajay & Gupta, Swati, 2017. "Bolder Disinvestment or Better Performance Contracts? Which Way Forward for India's State-Owned Enterprises," Working Papers 17/205, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    8. Ajay Chhibber & Swati Gupta, 2017. "Bolder Divestment Not Better Performance Contracts are the Solution for India's Public Sector," Working Papers 2017-19, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    9. Michael Klien, 2014. "Corporatization and the Behavior of Public Firms: How Shifting Control Rights Affects Political Interference in Water Prices," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 44(4), pages 393-422, June.
    10. Aivazian, Varouj A. & Ge, Ying & Qiu, Jiaping, 2005. "Corporate governance and manager turnover: An unusual social experiment," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1459-1481, June.
    11. Ajay Chhibber, 2021. "India's Interventionist State: Reduce Its Scope and Improve Its Capability," Working Papers 2021-02, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    12. repec:ilo:ilowps:366690 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Andres, Luis Alberto & Guasch, Jose Luis & Azumendi, Sebastian Lopez, 2011. "Governance in state-owned enterprises revisited : the cases of water and electricity in Latin America and the Caribbean," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5747, The World Bank.
    14. Ajay Chhibber & Swati Gupta, 2017. "Public Sector Undertakings: Bharat’s other Ratnas," Working Papers 2017-6, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    15. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2002. "Religion and Political Economy in an International Panel," Scholarly Articles 3221170, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    16. Yang, Qing Gong & Temple, Paul, 2012. "Reform and competitive selection in China: An analysis of firm exits," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 286-299.
    17. Indur M. Goklany, 2003. "Relative Contributions of Global Warming to Various Climate Sensitive Risks, and Their Implications for Adaptation and Mitigation," Energy & Environment, , vol. 14(6), pages 797-822, November.
    18. Axel Dreher, 2002. "Does Globalization Affect Growth?," Development and Comp Systems 0210004, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 16 Jun 2003.
    19. Malte LÜBKER, 2004. "Globalization and perceptions of social inequality," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 143(1-2), pages 91-128, March.
    20. Adam Szirmai, 2011. "Manufacturing and Economic Development," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2011-075, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    21. William Easterly & Ross Levine & David Roodman, 2003. "New Data, New doubts: A Comment on Burnside and Dollar's "Aid, Policies, and Growth" (2000)," NBER Working Papers 9846, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3036. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Roula I. Yazigi (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.