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The Friedman Rule in an Overlapping Generations Model: Social Security in Reverse

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  • Benjamin Eden

    () (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

Abstract

The welfare gains from adopting a zero nominal interest policy depend on the implementation details. Here I focus on a government loan program that crowds out lending and borrowing and other money substitutes. Since money can be costlessly created the resources spent on creating money substitutes are a "social waste". Moving from an economy with strictly positive nominal interest rate to an economy with zero nominal interest rate will increase consumption by the amount of resources spent on lending and borrowing. But in general welfare will increase by more than that because consumption smoothing is better under zero nominal interest rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Eden, 2007. "The Friedman Rule in an Overlapping Generations Model: Social Security in Reverse," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0717, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:0717
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/VUECON/vu07-w17.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Welfare cost of inflation; money substitutes; wealth redistribution; Friedman rule;

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance

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