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Reconciling the Effects of Monetary Policy Actions on Consumption Within a Heterogeneous Agent Framework

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  • Yamin Ahmad

    () (Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater)

Abstract

This paper incorporates heterogeneous agents into a NNS model with nominal inertia. Heterogeneous households are introduced into NNS models to try and reconcile the movements in interest rates, consumption and inflation. The key findings here are that heterogeneity and wage inertia are needed to help reconcile these observations. Aggregate consumption and its expected growth rate responds much more to myopic households than compared to optimizing households when myopic households set wages one periods in advance. When myopic households set wages in the current period, aggregate consumption and its expected growth rate is found to respond much more to the respective profiles for optimizing households.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamin Ahmad, 2004. "Reconciling the Effects of Monetary Policy Actions on Consumption Within a Heterogeneous Agent Framework," Working Papers 05-02, UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:uww:wpaper:05-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption; Aggregation; Interest Rates; Heterogeneity; Monetary Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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