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A Short Note on Economic Development and Socioeconomic Inequality in Female Body Weight

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  • Deuchert, Eva

    ()

  • Cabus, Sofie J.
  • Tafreschi, Darjusch

    ()

Abstract

The origin of the obesity epidemic in developing countries is still poorly understood. It has been prominently argued that economic development provides a natural interpretation of the growth in obesity. This paper tests the main aggregated predictions of the theoretical framework to analyze obesity: Average female body weight is associated with economic development. In relatively poor countries, obesity is a phenomenon of the socioeconomic elite. With economic development, obesity shifts towards individuals with lower socioeconomic status.

Suggested Citation

  • Deuchert, Eva & Cabus, Sofie J. & Tafreschi, Darjusch, 2012. "A Short Note on Economic Development and Socioeconomic Inequality in Female Body Weight," Economics Working Paper Series 1204, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:usg:econwp:2012:04
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    15. Tafreschi, Darjusch, 2015. "The income body weight gradients in the developing economy of China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 115-134.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sun, Ruoyan, 2016. "Optimal weight based on energy imbalance and utility maximization," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 442(C), pages 429-435.
    2. Butzlaf, Iris & Minos, Dimitrios, 2016. "Understanding the Drivers of Overweight and Obesity in Developing Countries: The Case of South Africa," GlobalFood Discussion Papers 232025, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    3. Tafreschi, Darjusch, 2015. "The income body weight gradients in the developing economy of China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 115-134.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Obesity; socioeconomic inequality; economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health

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