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Assessing the Impact of Social Grants on Inequality: A South African Case Study

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  • Reinhard Schiel
  • Murray Leibbrandt
  • David Lam

Abstract

The democratic government in South Africa has developed a system of social grants to combat the high levels of poverty and inequality inherited from the apartheid regime. With the help of modest economic growth and an associated increase in per capita household income, the introduction and expansion of social grants has helped alleviate the inherited burden of poverty. On the other hand income inequality has remained stubbornly high in post-apartheid South Africa and the role of these grants in inequality reduction remains unclear.

Suggested Citation

  • Reinhard Schiel & Murray Leibbrandt & David Lam, 2014. "Assessing the Impact of Social Grants on Inequality: A South African Case Study," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2014-160, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2014-160
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2014-160.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Silber, Jacques, 1989. "Factor Components, Population Subgroups and the Computation of the Gini Index of Inequality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(1), pages 107-115, February.
    4. Azevedo, Joao Pedro & Inchauste, Gabriela & Olivieri, Sergio & Saavedra, Jaime & Winkler, Hernan, 2013. "Is labor income responsible for poverty reduction ? a decomposition approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6414, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Margherita Scarlato & Giorgio d'Agostino, 2019. "Cash Transfers, Labor Supply, and Gender Inequality: Evidence from South Africa," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 159-184, October.

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