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Oil price shocks and the Portuguese economy since the 1970s


  • Robalo, Pedro Brito
  • Salvado, João Cotter


This paper assesses empirically the effect of oil price shocks on Portuguese aggregate economic activity, industrial production and price level. We take the usual multivariate VAR methodology to investigate the magnitude and stability of this relationship. In doing so, we follow the approach presented in the recent literature and adopt different oil price specifications. We conclude that, as for most industrialized countries, the nature of this relationship changed in the mid-1980s. Furthermore, we show that the main Portuguese macroeconomic variables have become progressively less respon

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  • Robalo, Pedro Brito & Salvado, João Cotter, 2008. "Oil price shocks and the Portuguese economy since the 1970s," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp529, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  • Handle: RePEc:unl:unlfep:wp529

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hamilton, James D., 1996. "This is what happened to the oil price-macroeconomy relationship," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 215-220, October.
    2. Lutz Kilian, 2008. "Exogenous Oil Supply Shocks: How Big Are They and How Much Do They Matter for the U.S. Economy?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 216-240, May.
    3. Finn, Mary G, 2000. "Perfect Competition and the Effects of Energy Price Increases on Economic Activity," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 400-416, August.
    4. Gisser, Micha & Goodwin, Thomas H, 1986. "Crude Oil and the Macroeconomy: Tests of Some Popular Notions: A Note," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 18(1), pages 95-103, February.
    5. Darby, Michael R, 1982. "The Price of Oil and World Inflation and Recession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 738-751, September.
    6. Hooker, Mark A, 2002. "Are Oil Shocks Inflationary? Asymmetric and Nonlinear Specifications versus Changes in Regime," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(2), pages 540-561, May.
    7. Hamilton, James D., 2003. "What is an oil shock?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 113(2), pages 363-398, April.
    8. Eastwood, Robert K, 1992. "Macroeconomic Impacts of Energy Shocks," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(3), pages 403-425, July.
    9. Hooker, Mark A., 1996. "This is what happened to the oil price-macroeconomy relationship: Reply," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 221-222, October.
    10. Hamilton, James D, 1983. "Oil and the Macroeconomy since World War II," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 228-248, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Susana Silva & Isabel Soares & Carlos Pinho, 2012. "The Impact of Renewable Energy Sources on Economic Growth and CO2 Emissions - a SVAR approach," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(4), pages 133-144.
    2. Joao Tovar Jalles, 2009. "Do Oil Prices Matter? The Case of a Small Open Economy," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 10(1), pages 65-87, May.
    3. repec:ers:journl:v:xv:y:2012:i:sie:p:133-144 is not listed on IDEAS

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