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Redistributive effects of indirect taxes: comparing arithmetical and behavioral simulations in Uruguay

Author

Listed:
  • Verónica Amarante

    () ( Instituto de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y de Administración, Universidad de la República)

  • Marisa Bucheli

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Cecilia Olivieri

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Ivone Perazzo

    () ( Instituto de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y de Administración, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

In this brief paper we compare the redistributive effect of a VAT reform using an arithmetical and a behavioral microsimulation model. We analyze the effects of the elimination of the VAT for a basket of goods which is intensively consumed by the poorest population. Our microsimulations are based on data from the expenditure survey. The behavioral model uses the Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System (QUAIDS) proposed by Banks et al (1997). Our results indicate that the change in the VAT implies a redistributive effect of small magnitude. The comparison of redistributive effects under the arithmetic and the behavioral simulation reveals that they are very similar.

Suggested Citation

  • Verónica Amarante & Marisa Bucheli & Cecilia Olivieri & Ivone Perazzo, 2011. "Redistributive effects of indirect taxes: comparing arithmetical and behavioral simulations in Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 2311, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:2311
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    File URL: http://cienciassociales.edu.uy/departamentodeeconomia/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/archivos/2311.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. François Bourguignon & Amedeo Spadaro, 2006. "Microsimulation as a tool for evaluating redistribution policies," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 4(1), pages 77-106, April.
    2. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Quadratic Engel Curves And Consumer Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 527-539, November.
    3. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Verónica Amarante & Maira Colacce & Victoria Tenenbaum, 2017. "National Care System in Uruguay: Who benefits and who pays?," WIDER Working Paper Series 002, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal redistribution; income inequality; taxes;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General

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