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On a dubious theory of cross-country differences in intelligence


  • Kevin Denny


Kanazawa (2007) offers an explanation for the variation across countries of average intelligence. It is based on the idea human intelligence is a domain specific adaptation and that both temperature and the distance from some putative point of origin are proxies for the degree of novelty that humans in a country have experienced. However the argument ignores many other considerations and is a priori weak and the data used questionable. A particular problem is that in calculating distances between countries it implicitly assumes that the earth is flat. This makes all the estimates biased and unreliable.

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  • Kevin Denny, 2009. "On a dubious theory of cross-country differences in intelligence," Working Papers 200918, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200918

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Patrick Honohan & Brendan Walsh, 2002. "Catching Up with the Leaders: The Irish Hare," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 33(1), pages 1-78.
    2. Colm McCarthy & John Lawlor, 2003. "Browsing onwards : Irish public spending in perspective," Open Access publications 10197/562, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
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    Intelligence; Measurement error; International comparisons; Intelligence levels; Intellect; Errors; Scientific;

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