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Cost Asymmetry and Taxation - Implications for Multinational Activity

  • Lynda Porter

    (University College Dublin)

This paper presents a novel approach to examining multinationality which features the associated proximity versus concentration trade-off. Borrowing an important tool that is widely used in the strategic trade policy literature, I employ a third country model to examine the effects of a specific policy initiative and a firm-specific advantage on individual firm configuration. The main findings are that taxes hurt the inefficient firm more, causing it to choose the exporting rather than the multinational method of serving markets. Consequently, multinational production is associated with cost-efficiency while the inefficient firm is more likely to be an exporter.

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File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/economics/research/papers/2003/WP03.11.pdf
File Function: First version, 2003
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by School Of Economics, University College Dublin in its series Working Papers with number 200311.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 15 Apr 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200311
Contact details of provider: Postal: UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4
Phone: +353-1-7067777
Fax: +353-1-283 0068
Web page: http://www.ucd.ie/economics

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  1. James R. Markusen, 1995. "The Boundaries of Multinational Enterprises and the Theory of International Trade," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 169-189, Spring.
  2. James A. Brander, 1995. "Strategic Trade Policy," NBER Working Papers 5020, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Markusen, James R. & Venables, Anthony J., 1998. "Multinational firms and the new trade theory," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 183-203, December.
  4. S. Lael Brainard, 1993. "A Simple Theory of Multinational Corporations and Trade with a Trade-Off Between Proximity and Concentration," NBER Working Papers 4269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Leahy, Dermot & Neary, J Peter, 1996. "International R&D Rivalry and Industrial Strategy without Government Commitment," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 322-38, October.
  6. Dixit, Avinash K & Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "The Use of Protection and Subsidies for Entry Promotion and Deterrence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(1), pages 139-52, March.
  7. Motta, Massimo, 1992. "Multinational firms and the tariff-jumping argument : A game theoretic analysis with some unconventional conclusions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1557-1571, December.
  8. Horstmann, Ignatius J. & Markusen, James R., 1992. "Endogenous market structures in international trade (natura facit saltum)," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1-2), pages 109-129, February.
  9. Helpman, Elhanan, 1984. "A Simple Theory of International Trade with Multinational Corporations," Scholarly Articles 3445092, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  10. Brander, James A. & Spencer, Barbara J., 1985. "Export subsidies and international market share rivalry," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1-2), pages 83-100, February.
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