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Exploring the Late Impact of the Financial Crisis using Gallup World Poll Data

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Listed:
  • Goran Holmqvist
  • Luisa Natali

Abstract

This paper explores the use of Gallup World Poll Data to assess the impact of the Great Recession on various dimensions of well-being in 41 OECD and/or EU countries from 2007 up until 2013. It should be read as a complementary background paper to the UNICEF Report Card which explores trends in child well-being in EU/OECD countries since 2007/8. Overall the findings provide clear indications that the crisis has had an impact across a number of self-reported dimensions of well-being. Indeed, a strong correlation between the intensity of the recession and the worsening of people’s perceptions about their own life is recorded since 2007. Data also indicate that the impact has still not peaked in a number of countries where indicators were still deteriorating as late as 2013. A “League Table” is also presented where countries are ranked in terms of change between 2007 and 2013 for four selected Gallup World Poll indicators related material well-being, perceptions of how society treats its children, health and subjective well-being.

Suggested Citation

  • Goran Holmqvist & Luisa Natali, 2014. "Exploring the Late Impact of the Financial Crisis using Gallup World Poll Data," Papers inwopa728, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa728
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Angus Deaton, 2008. "Income, Health, and Well-Being around the World: Evidence from the Gallup World Poll," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(2), pages 53-72, Spring.
    2. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Price Indexes, Inequality, and the Measurement of World Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 5-34, March.
    3. repec:pri:cheawb:deaton_income_health_and_wellbeing_around_the_world_evidence_%20from_gall is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:pri:rpdevs:presidential%20address%2017january%202010%20all is not listed on IDEAS
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Exploring the Late Impact of the Financial Crisis using Gallup World Poll Data
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2014-11-25 17:31:17

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    Cited by:

    1. Yekaterina Chzhen, 2016. "Perceptions of the Economic Crisis in Europe: Do Adults in Households with Children Feel a Greater Impact?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(1), pages 341-360, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child well-being; economic crisis; indicators; surveys;

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