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Relative Income Poverty among Children in Rich Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan Bradshaw
  • Yekaterina Chzhen
  • Gill Main
  • Bruno Martorano
  • Leonardo Menchini
  • Chris De Neubourg

Abstract

This paper presents and discusses child relative income poverty statistics for 35 economically advanced countries, representing all the members of the European Union, Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland and the United States. As most of the data refer to the year 2008, the results partly reflect the initial impact of the global economic crisis as well as government responses. According to the data, Nordic countries and the Netherlands present the lowest child relative poverty levels, while Japan, the United States, most of the Southern European countries and some of the new EU member states have among the highest. Several factors are associated with the risk of poverty, such as demographic composition, educational level of household members, labour conditions, but the extent to which these factors influence the risk of poverty vary considerably across countries. Lastly, in several countries the role of government is found to be highly important in reducing child poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Bradshaw & Yekaterina Chzhen & Gill Main & Bruno Martorano & Leonardo Menchini & Chris De Neubourg, 2012. "Relative Income Poverty among Children in Rich Countries," Papers inwopa655, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa655
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Panos Pashardes, 2007. "Why Child Poverty in Cyprus is so Low," Cyprus Economic Policy Review, University of Cyprus, Economics Research Centre, vol. 1(2), pages 3-16, December.
    2. Bruce Bradbury & Markus Jantti, 1999. "Child Poverty across Industrialized Nations," Papers iopeps99/70, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Martorano, 2014. "The Consequences of the Recent Economic Crisis and Government Reactions for Children," Papers inwopa722, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Bruno Martorano, 2014. "Pre-crisis Conditions and Government Policy Responses: Chile and Mexico during the Great Recession," Papers inwopa729, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Bruno Martorano, 2013. "The Australian Household Stimulus Package: Lessons from the recent economic crisis," Papers inwopa697, Innocenti Working Papers.
    4. Yekaterina Chzhen, 2016. "Perceptions of the Economic Crisis in Europe: Do Adults in Households with Children Feel a Greater Impact?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(1), pages 341-360, May.
    5. Di Qi & Yichao Wu, 2019. "Comparing the Extent and Levels of Child Poverty by the Income and Multidimensional Deprivation Approach in China," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 12(2), pages 627-645, April.
    6. Bronfman, Javier, 2014. "Beyond Income: A Study of Multidimensional Poverty in Chile," MPRA Paper 63256, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Juho Härkönen, 2017. "Diverging destinies in international perspective: Education, single motherhood, and child poverty," LIS Working papers 713, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    8. Antoanneta Potsi & Antonella D’Agostino & Caterina Giusti & Linda Porciani, 2016. "Childhood and capability deprivation in Italy: a multidimensional and fuzzy set approach," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2571-2590, November.
    9. Chris De Neubourg & Jingqing Chai & Marlous de Milliano & Ilze Plavgo, 2013. "Step-by-Step Guidelines to the Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA)," Papers inwopa695, Innocenti Working Papers.
    10. Luisa Natali & Bruno Martorano & Sudhanshu Handa & Goran Holmqvist & Yekaterina Chzhen, 2014. "Trends in Child Well-being in EU Countries during the Great Recession: A cross-country comparative perspective," Papers inwopa730, Innocenti Working Papers.
    11. Tausch, Arno, 2015. "Wo Frau Kanzlerin Angela Merkel irrt: Der Sozialschutz in der Welt, der Anteil Europas und die Beurteilung seiner Effizienz [Where Chancellor Angela Merkel got it wrong: social protection in the wo," MPRA Paper 66462, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Patricia Justino & Bruno Martorano, 2016. "Redistribution, inequality and political participation: Evidence from Mexico during the 2008 financial crisis," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-140, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Kolbeinn Hólmar Stefánsson & Lovísa Arnardóttir & Anton Örn Karlsson, 2018. "Children‘s Deprivation and Economic Vulnerability in Iceland 2009 and 2014," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 11(3), pages 783-803, June.
    14. Patricia Justino & Bruno Martorano, 2016. "Redistribution, inequality and political participation: Evidence from Mexico during the 2008 financial crisis," WIDER Working Paper Series 140, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    15. Bruno Martorano, 2014. "Is it possible to adjust ‘with a human face’? Differences in fiscal consolidation strategies between Hungary and Iceland," Papers inwopa719, Innocenti Working Papers.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    child poverty; child well-being; employment; income household; industrialized countries;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics

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