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Parenting, Family Care and Adolescence in East and Southern Africa: An evidence-focused literature review

Author

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  • Rachel Bray
  • Andrew Dawes
  • UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti

Abstract

Based on an evidence-focused literature review, this paper examines existing knowledge on raising adolescents in east and southern African countries, including Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Country selection was based on the availability of relevant literature and data. The vast majority of studies on parenting and adolescent development is based on research from the global north. This research sought to deepen understandings of family life, care practices and support networks in the east and southern African region so as to inform policy and interventions that seek to improve adolescent-family relations and reduce risk behaviours. An evidence-informed model for understanding the ecology of adolescent-parent relationships in the cultural and economic contexts of the region is provided. In addition, a framework for exploring contextually-relevant dimensions of parenting through research and practice is offered.

Suggested Citation

  • Rachel Bray & Andrew Dawes & UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, 2016. "Parenting, Family Care and Adolescence in East and Southern Africa: An evidence-focused literature review," Papers indipa856, Innocenti Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:indipa:indipa856
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Assefa Admassie, 2002. "Explaining the High Incidence of Child Labour in Sub–Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 14(2), pages 251-275.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jennifer E. Lansford & Susannah Zietz & Suha M. Al-Hassan & Dario Bacchini & Marc H. Bornstein & Lei Chang & Kirby Deater-Deckard & Laura Di Giunta & Kenneth A. Dodge & Sevtap Gurdal & Qin Liu & Qian , 2021. "Culture and Social Change in Mothers’ and Fathers’ Individualism, Collectivism and Parenting Attitudes," Social Sciences, MDPI, vol. 10(12), pages 1-20, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    adolescent health; adolescents; family environment; gender issues; HIV and AIDS; parent-child relationship; risk;
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