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Policies for Reducing Income Inequality: Latin America During the Last Decade

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Andrea Cornia
  • Bruno Martorano

    (University of Florence)

Abstract

In most Latin American countries, income inequality rose steadily during the 1980s and 1990s, and declined from 2002 to 2007. This paper analyzes the factors that could explain the changes in income inequality from 1990 to 2007, by focusing on external shocks and changes in domestic policies. Particular reference will be made to macroeconomic, educational and social policies introduced during recent years, and to the impact of the election of an increasing number of leftof- centre governments which have come to power during the last decade. The paper tests econometrically the importance of all these factors on data for 18 countries from 1990 to 2007. On the basis of this model, the paper estimates the income inequality level for the crisis years 2008 and 2009. The results suggest that a continuation of fiscally prudent distributive and redistributive policies, which have emerged in much of the region in the 2000s, should preserve most of the income inequality gains recorded in recent years.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Bruno Martorano, 2010. "Policies for Reducing Income Inequality: Latin America During the Last Decade," Working papers 1006, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  • Handle: RePEc:uce:wpaper:1006
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    File URL: http://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/files/Postscript_Formatted_Policies_for_reducing_income_inequality.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Roberto Frenkel & Martin Rapetti, 2008. "Five years of competitive and stable real exchange rate in Argentina, 2002-2007," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 215-226.
    2. Esteban Pérez Caldentey & Matías Vernengo, 2010. "Back to the future: Latin America's current development strategy," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 623-644, July.
    3. Leonardo Gasparini & Guillermo Cruces & Leopoldo Tornarolli & Mariana Marchionni, 2009. "A Turning Point? Recent Developments on Inequality in Latin America and the Caribbean," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0081, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    4. Kristensen, Nicolai & Cunningham, Wendy, 2006. "Do minimum wages in Latin America and the Caribbean matter ? Evidence from 19 countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3870, The World Bank.
    5. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597, 09-2019.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Martorano, 2014. "The Impact of Uruguay's 2007 Tax Reform on Equity and Efficiency," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(6), pages 701-714, November.
    2. Isabel Ortiz & Matthew Cummins, 2011. "Global Inequality: Beyond the Bottom Billion – A Rapid Review of Income Distribution in 141 Countries," Working papers 1102, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    3. Bruno Martorano & Marco Sanfilippo, 2012. "Innovative Features in Conditional Cash Transfers: An impact evaluation of Chile Solidario on households and children," Papers inwopa656, Innocenti Working Papers.

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