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Mapping as Organizing: An analysis of how homeworkers are using mapping as an organizing tool

  • Rosaria Burchielli

    ()

    (School of Economics, La Trobe University)

  • Donna M. Buttigieg

    ()

    (Department of Management Monash University Gippsland Campus, Churchill)

  • Annie Delaney

    ()

    (School of Economics, La Trobe University)

Registered author(s):

    Until recently, organizing in the informal sector has mainly been conducted by grassroots organizations and it appeared that trade unions largely ignored the plight of informal workers. Successful organizing has, however, occurred in the informal sector through homeworker mapping. Homeworker mapping refers to a vertical and horizontal mapping program based on principles of participation and education through action research. This paper explores homeworker mapping as a successful organizing strategy by examining primary documents from homeworker organizations. The paper starts with a discussion and definition of the informal sector and of homework, and then proceeds to examine the mapping process and its outcomes. It includes a detailed case study of the mapping experience in Chile to illustrate aspects of mapping as organizing. The paper concludes with an examination of the implications of mapping as an organizing strategy for trade unions and other organizations.

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    File URL: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/130898/2006.05.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2006.05.pdf
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    Paper provided by School of Economics, La Trobe University in its series Working Papers with number 2006.05.

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    Length: 20 pages
    Date of creation: Jun 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:trb:wpaper:2006.05
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/economics

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    1. Carr, Marilyn & Chen, Martha Alter, 2002. "Globalization and the informal economy : how global trade and investment impact on the working poor," ILO Working Papers 354172, International Labour Organization.
    2. Christina Cregan, 2005. "Can organizing work? An inductive analysis of individual attitudes toward union membership," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(2), pages 282-304, January.
    3. Prugl, Elisabeth & Tinker, Irene, 1997. "Microentrepreneurs and homeworkers: Convergent categories," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(9), pages 1471-1482, September.
    4. Beynon, Huw & Grimshaw, Damian & Rubery, Jill & Ward, Kevin, 2002. "Managing Employment Change: The New Realities of Work," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199248704, March.
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