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The Effect of Exports on Labor Informality : Evidence from Argentina

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  • Safojan, Romina

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Safojan, Romina, 2019. "The Effect of Exports on Labor Informality : Evidence from Argentina," Discussion Paper 2019-003, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:de04345d-1e8f-4b40-afa2-0feb810ad5e0
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    File URL: https://pure.uvt.nl/ws/portalfiles/portal/28994692/2019_003.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Costas Meghir & Renata Narita & Jean-Marc Robin, 2015. "Wages and Informality in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(4), pages 1509-1546, April.
    2. Guillermo Cruces & Guido Porto & Mariana Viollaz, 2018. "Trade liberalization and informality in Argentina: exploring the adjustment mechanisms," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 27(1), pages 1-29, December.
    3. David H. Autor & David Dorn & Gordon H. Hanson, 2015. "Untangling Trade and Technology: Evidence from Local Labour Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(584), pages 621-646, May.
    4. Bosch, Mariano & Goñi-Pacchioni, Edwin & Maloney, William, 2012. "Trade liberalization, labor reforms and formal–informal employment dynamics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 653-667.
    5. Cunningham, Wendy & Salvagno, Javier Bustos, 2011. "Youth employment transitions in Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5521, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rolando Morales Anaya, 2020. "Mineral Trading And Informal Labour In Bolivia," Economia Coyuntural,Revista de temas de perspectivas y coyuntura, Instituto de Investigaciones Economicas y Sociales 'Jose Ortiz Mercado' (IIES-JOM), Facultad de Ciencias Economicas, Administrativas y Financieras, Universidad Autonoma Gabriel Rene Moreno, vol. 5(2), pages 1-32.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    exports; labor informality; productivity; task complexity; Argentina;
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